Presentation Title

Virtual Leadership: Online Influence for Malevolent or Positive Innovation

Advisor Information

Douglas Derrick

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

The use of a virtual medium has become the norm for social interaction and organization communication. Furthermore, virtual communication has allowed for increased malevolent creativity among violent extremist organizations such as the Islamic State in geographically dispersed areas. Using data collected from a sample of students, we investigated how virtual messaging can be used to influence followership toward action and innovation on behalf of an organization. The findings from this study indicate that creativity varies across leader preference between destructive and productive domains in a virtual setting. When faced with justification for revenge and malevolence, followers were more creative when influenced by rational appeals from a pragmatic leader. However, when faced with a more generative, positive call to action, followers were more creative when influenced by inspirational appeals from an ideological leader. Implications for online influence for both malevolent and productive innovation will be discussed.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:30 AM

Virtual Leadership: Online Influence for Malevolent or Positive Innovation

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The use of a virtual medium has become the norm for social interaction and organization communication. Furthermore, virtual communication has allowed for increased malevolent creativity among violent extremist organizations such as the Islamic State in geographically dispersed areas. Using data collected from a sample of students, we investigated how virtual messaging can be used to influence followership toward action and innovation on behalf of an organization. The findings from this study indicate that creativity varies across leader preference between destructive and productive domains in a virtual setting. When faced with justification for revenge and malevolence, followers were more creative when influenced by rational appeals from a pragmatic leader. However, when faced with a more generative, positive call to action, followers were more creative when influenced by inspirational appeals from an ideological leader. Implications for online influence for both malevolent and productive innovation will be discussed.