Presentation Title

Leg Recognition Using a Single Accelerometer

Advisor Information

Jong-Hoon Youn

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 3:00 PM

Abstract

A cheaper, yet, effective option to analyze a human’s balance and symmetry is essential in today’s technology-driven society. This research study takes an approach on leg recognition, or determining which leg makes a step, using a single accelerometer sensor located on the backside of a subject’s trunk area. After data is collected, a Java program analyzes the data to calculate which leg was used based on the majority of three algorithms developed for the study. Subjects were asked to walk straight and at a comfortable pace with this trunk-located sensor for 50 meters. Five participants were used to collect the necessary data for research. The results from this study show a number of inconsistencies between subjects due to limitations within the program and the type of data itself. We conclude that using only a single accelerometer, located on the subject’s trunk area, is not enough to consistently calculate which leg a step is made with across all humans.

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Mar 4th, 2:45 PM Mar 4th, 3:00 PM

Leg Recognition Using a Single Accelerometer

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

A cheaper, yet, effective option to analyze a human’s balance and symmetry is essential in today’s technology-driven society. This research study takes an approach on leg recognition, or determining which leg makes a step, using a single accelerometer sensor located on the backside of a subject’s trunk area. After data is collected, a Java program analyzes the data to calculate which leg was used based on the majority of three algorithms developed for the study. Subjects were asked to walk straight and at a comfortable pace with this trunk-located sensor for 50 meters. Five participants were used to collect the necessary data for research. The results from this study show a number of inconsistencies between subjects due to limitations within the program and the type of data itself. We conclude that using only a single accelerometer, located on the subject’s trunk area, is not enough to consistently calculate which leg a step is made with across all humans.