Presentation Title

The Interplay of Problem Construction and Self-Perceived Creativity on the Generation of Creative Solutions

Advisor Information

Roni Reiter-Palmon

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

The aim of this study was to discover the relationship between problem construction and self-perceived creativity on the generation of creative solutions. It was theorized that individuals who viewed themselves as high in creativity would form solutions that were highly creative, regardless of manipulation; while the utilization of PC will have a significant positive effect on the solutions devised by those who were lacking in self-perceived creativity. A between subject design with 158 participants was utilized. Participants either engaged in problem construction (rephrasing an ill-defined problem), or did not, based on their randomly assigned condition, before conceiving of a solution to given ill-defined problem. The solutions were then rated for creativity. A self-assessed measure of perceived creative ability was then administered. The results indicated that neither problem construction nor self-perceived creativity was significantly correlated with creativity.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:30 AM

The Interplay of Problem Construction and Self-Perceived Creativity on the Generation of Creative Solutions

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The aim of this study was to discover the relationship between problem construction and self-perceived creativity on the generation of creative solutions. It was theorized that individuals who viewed themselves as high in creativity would form solutions that were highly creative, regardless of manipulation; while the utilization of PC will have a significant positive effect on the solutions devised by those who were lacking in self-perceived creativity. A between subject design with 158 participants was utilized. Participants either engaged in problem construction (rephrasing an ill-defined problem), or did not, based on their randomly assigned condition, before conceiving of a solution to given ill-defined problem. The solutions were then rated for creativity. A self-assessed measure of perceived creative ability was then administered. The results indicated that neither problem construction nor self-perceived creativity was significantly correlated with creativity.