Presentation Title

Increased Lateral Forefoot Pressure Regularity in Older Adults is Independent from Gait Velocity

Advisor Information

Jennifer Yentes

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 2:15 PM

Abstract

As we age, the foot bone and ligament structural properties are altered leading to changes in plantar pressure distributions. Studies investigating the effects of aging on plantar pressure distributions have found decreased peak pressures in the heel and medial foot masks in older adults. In addition, plantar soft tissue in older adults display increased stiffness and an altered response to changing impact velocity. These factors contribute to high prevalence of foot pain and fall risk in older adults. The regularity of peak pressures, within a spectrum of walking velocities, can provide insight into the preferred loading behavior and potential gait differences due to aging.

Seventeen healthy young adults (19-35 yrs) and 20 healthy older adults (65+ yrs) participated. Subjects were fitted to a control shoe with pressure sensitive insoles inside. Subjects then walked on the treadmill for 10 minutes in each of three different speed conditions (self-selected speed (SSWS) & ±20% SSWS) while plantar pressures were recorded. The pressure insole was divided into 7 foot regions. The amount and temporal structure of peak pressure variability in the right foot was used for comparisons. Regional peak pressure amount of variability and temporal structure was calculated from 300 consecutive steps.

The results indicate increasingly repetitive loading in the lateral forefoot region. Moreover, the results support previous findings that amount and temporal structure of variability provide different information about a system. Amount of variability is more sensitive to changing gait speeds. Whereas temporal structure was better able to distinguish between groups.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:45 PM Mar 4th, 2:15 PM

Increased Lateral Forefoot Pressure Regularity in Older Adults is Independent from Gait Velocity

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

As we age, the foot bone and ligament structural properties are altered leading to changes in plantar pressure distributions. Studies investigating the effects of aging on plantar pressure distributions have found decreased peak pressures in the heel and medial foot masks in older adults. In addition, plantar soft tissue in older adults display increased stiffness and an altered response to changing impact velocity. These factors contribute to high prevalence of foot pain and fall risk in older adults. The regularity of peak pressures, within a spectrum of walking velocities, can provide insight into the preferred loading behavior and potential gait differences due to aging.

Seventeen healthy young adults (19-35 yrs) and 20 healthy older adults (65+ yrs) participated. Subjects were fitted to a control shoe with pressure sensitive insoles inside. Subjects then walked on the treadmill for 10 minutes in each of three different speed conditions (self-selected speed (SSWS) & ±20% SSWS) while plantar pressures were recorded. The pressure insole was divided into 7 foot regions. The amount and temporal structure of peak pressure variability in the right foot was used for comparisons. Regional peak pressure amount of variability and temporal structure was calculated from 300 consecutive steps.

The results indicate increasingly repetitive loading in the lateral forefoot region. Moreover, the results support previous findings that amount and temporal structure of variability provide different information about a system. Amount of variability is more sensitive to changing gait speeds. Whereas temporal structure was better able to distinguish between groups.