Presentation Title

Development and Evaluation of the Breastfeeding and Sexuality Impact Scale

Advisor Information

Sofia Jawed-Wessel

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2016 9:15 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 9:30 AM

Abstract

Background: Currently, the research that is available on the impact of breastfeeding on sexuality has targeted White pregnant or postpartum women and has yet to acknowledge non-White and non-pregnant women. The majority of women make decisions on breastfeeding based on preconceptions established before they even become pregnant. Sexuality is related to why some women choose not to breastfeed. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a scale to assess non-pregnant Black women’s perceptions of how breastfeeding might impact their sex lives Methods: The study utilized a two-phase, mixed-methods approach that was driven by the Theory of Planned Behavior. Participants were women who identified as African American or Black between the ages of 19 to 45 and in their childbearing years who were not currently pregnant or a parent. Participants were recruited via fliers and social media websites. Phase One utilized a semi-structured interview guide that was driven by participants’ responses during the focus groups and one-on-one interviews. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and loaded into QSR NVivo software. In Phase Two, the Breastfeeding and Sexuality Impact Scale (BASIS) was created using the Phase One findings and distributed online. The BASIS was analyzed using SPSS Statistics 21.0. Results: The themes that emerged during Phase One included: the benefits to breastfeeding, barriers to breastfeeding, and the sexualization of breasts. Conclusion: Expectancy-value theories should be used to understand non-pregnant Black women’s perceptions of how breastfeeding may impact their sex lives. Further, the findings should be used to develop formal breastfeeding education.

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Mar 4th, 9:15 AM Mar 4th, 9:30 AM

Development and Evaluation of the Breastfeeding and Sexuality Impact Scale

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Background: Currently, the research that is available on the impact of breastfeeding on sexuality has targeted White pregnant or postpartum women and has yet to acknowledge non-White and non-pregnant women. The majority of women make decisions on breastfeeding based on preconceptions established before they even become pregnant. Sexuality is related to why some women choose not to breastfeed. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a scale to assess non-pregnant Black women’s perceptions of how breastfeeding might impact their sex lives Methods: The study utilized a two-phase, mixed-methods approach that was driven by the Theory of Planned Behavior. Participants were women who identified as African American or Black between the ages of 19 to 45 and in their childbearing years who were not currently pregnant or a parent. Participants were recruited via fliers and social media websites. Phase One utilized a semi-structured interview guide that was driven by participants’ responses during the focus groups and one-on-one interviews. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and loaded into QSR NVivo software. In Phase Two, the Breastfeeding and Sexuality Impact Scale (BASIS) was created using the Phase One findings and distributed online. The BASIS was analyzed using SPSS Statistics 21.0. Results: The themes that emerged during Phase One included: the benefits to breastfeeding, barriers to breastfeeding, and the sexualization of breasts. Conclusion: Expectancy-value theories should be used to understand non-pregnant Black women’s perceptions of how breastfeeding may impact their sex lives. Further, the findings should be used to develop formal breastfeeding education.