Presentation Title

Regulation of radish nitrate reductase activity by light suppression

Advisor Information

Mark Schoenbeck

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

Nitrate reductase generates nitrite, and nitrite is subsequently reduced to ammonia for amino acid synthesis. The objective was to determine whether there is a maturation even at which the plant switches from light suppression of nitrate reductase to light induction. Light normally positively regulates nitrate reductase activity but, light was observed to suppress nitrate reductase activity and altered to enhancement between the 4th and 5th week of growth. The exact day varied between samples but was always between the 4th and 5th week. Recent experiments have supported the initial hypothesis. Green house grown radish samples were grown and compared to lab grown radish seedlings, which, served as the experimental control for nitrate reductase activity, by assay detection. Primers were designed with the use of NCBI nucleotide blast database to amplify and clone the nitrate reductase gene. Efforts to clone the radish NR coding sequence have been successful, yielding what appears to be a sequence with near identity to NR-coding sequences from other closely related plant species. The sequence will be useful in determining whether light suppression of NR occurs at the level of RNA transcript abundance, as determined through RT-PCR experiments.

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Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Regulation of radish nitrate reductase activity by light suppression

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Nitrate reductase generates nitrite, and nitrite is subsequently reduced to ammonia for amino acid synthesis. The objective was to determine whether there is a maturation even at which the plant switches from light suppression of nitrate reductase to light induction. Light normally positively regulates nitrate reductase activity but, light was observed to suppress nitrate reductase activity and altered to enhancement between the 4th and 5th week of growth. The exact day varied between samples but was always between the 4th and 5th week. Recent experiments have supported the initial hypothesis. Green house grown radish samples were grown and compared to lab grown radish seedlings, which, served as the experimental control for nitrate reductase activity, by assay detection. Primers were designed with the use of NCBI nucleotide blast database to amplify and clone the nitrate reductase gene. Efforts to clone the radish NR coding sequence have been successful, yielding what appears to be a sequence with near identity to NR-coding sequences from other closely related plant species. The sequence will be useful in determining whether light suppression of NR occurs at the level of RNA transcript abundance, as determined through RT-PCR experiments.