Presentation Title

Perception of self-motion using virtual reality augments context independent transfer in young healthy adults

Advisor Information

Mukul Mukherjee

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 4:00 PM

Abstract

An incongruence exists between static visual and dynamic proprioceptive feedback when walking on a treadmill. This conflict may be resolved by removing visual feedback. Alternatively, Virtual Reality affords a resolution by providing the perception of self-motion. The first purpose of this study was to determine whether perception of self-motion in a Virtual Reality environment has greater contribution to transfer effects than the absence of visual feedback. The second purpose was to conclude whether differences exist between transfer tests performed overground versus on a treadmill. Twenty young healthy adults were randomly assigned to one of two transfer contexts: Treadmill (TM) or Overground (OG) and one of two training conditions: Eyes Open (EO) or Eyes Closed (EC). All subjects walked on a split-belt treadmill using a locomotor adaptation paradigm. Subjects in the EO group were exposed to Virtual Reality and the EC group were not. The TM group performed the transfer test on the treadmill while the OG group did so overground. Significance was found to exist as a result of condition, but not context. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction effect between stride time asymmetry for transfer tests between OG and TM and the presence or absence of vision during training. As a result, we found sensory conflict created while walking on a treadmill is resolved either by removing vision or by providing augmented visual feedback. Furthermore, temporal asymmetry transfer is not affected by context if training incorporates sensory conflict resolution through augmented visual feedback such as Virtual Reality.

Comments

Winner of Best Graduate Poster Presentation

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Mar 4th, 2:30 PM Mar 4th, 4:00 PM

Perception of self-motion using virtual reality augments context independent transfer in young healthy adults

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

An incongruence exists between static visual and dynamic proprioceptive feedback when walking on a treadmill. This conflict may be resolved by removing visual feedback. Alternatively, Virtual Reality affords a resolution by providing the perception of self-motion. The first purpose of this study was to determine whether perception of self-motion in a Virtual Reality environment has greater contribution to transfer effects than the absence of visual feedback. The second purpose was to conclude whether differences exist between transfer tests performed overground versus on a treadmill. Twenty young healthy adults were randomly assigned to one of two transfer contexts: Treadmill (TM) or Overground (OG) and one of two training conditions: Eyes Open (EO) or Eyes Closed (EC). All subjects walked on a split-belt treadmill using a locomotor adaptation paradigm. Subjects in the EO group were exposed to Virtual Reality and the EC group were not. The TM group performed the transfer test on the treadmill while the OG group did so overground. Significance was found to exist as a result of condition, but not context. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction effect between stride time asymmetry for transfer tests between OG and TM and the presence or absence of vision during training. As a result, we found sensory conflict created while walking on a treadmill is resolved either by removing vision or by providing augmented visual feedback. Furthermore, temporal asymmetry transfer is not affected by context if training incorporates sensory conflict resolution through augmented visual feedback such as Virtual Reality.