Marmoset monkeys display context-dependent increases in affiliation after exposure to strangers

Author #1

Abstract

Reestablishing contact with a long-term mate after separation is critical for the long-term preservation of a monogamous bond. In the current study we examined the social interactions between male-female marmoset pairs (Callithrix jacchus) following exposure to an unfamiliar male-female marmoset pair. Male and female marmosets (n=11) were individually exposed to the home-enclosure of an unfamiliar male-female marmoset pair (i.e., intruder test) for 30-minutes during two counterbalanced conditions: (1) Same-sex stranger exposure-only and (2) Unfamiliar male-female pair exposure. We measured the rate and duration of social interactions (i.e., proximity, huddling, grooming, and sociosexual behavior) between the intruder and their pair-mate upon reunion, following the intruder test, as well as during a baseline (i.e., undisturbed) condition. Male and female marmosets maintained close proximity with their pair-mate for a greater duration [F(2,16)=12.9,p<0.001], huddled more frequently [F(2,12)=6.94,p=0.01], and huddled for a greater duration [F(2,12)=8.2,p=0.006] upon reunion, following exposure to a same-sex stranger compared to exposure to an unfamiliar marmoset pair and baseline. We demonstrated that marmosets display enhanced affiliation with their pairmate following exposure to a same-sex marmoset, but not following exposure to an unfamiliar male-female marmoset pair. Thus, marmosets appear to utilize close proximity and physical contact with their pair-mate to buffer the potentially stressful experience of interacting with a same-sex stranger in a novel environment.

 
Mar 4th, 9:30 AM Mar 4th, 9:45 AM

Marmoset monkeys display context-dependent increases in affiliation after exposure to strangers

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Reestablishing contact with a long-term mate after separation is critical for the long-term preservation of a monogamous bond. In the current study we examined the social interactions between male-female marmoset pairs (Callithrix jacchus) following exposure to an unfamiliar male-female marmoset pair. Male and female marmosets (n=11) were individually exposed to the home-enclosure of an unfamiliar male-female marmoset pair (i.e., intruder test) for 30-minutes during two counterbalanced conditions: (1) Same-sex stranger exposure-only and (2) Unfamiliar male-female pair exposure. We measured the rate and duration of social interactions (i.e., proximity, huddling, grooming, and sociosexual behavior) between the intruder and their pair-mate upon reunion, following the intruder test, as well as during a baseline (i.e., undisturbed) condition. Male and female marmosets maintained close proximity with their pair-mate for a greater duration [F(2,16)=12.9,p<0.001], huddled more frequently [F(2,12)=6.94,p=0.01], and huddled for a greater duration [F(2,12)=8.2,p=0.006] upon reunion, following exposure to a same-sex stranger compared to exposure to an unfamiliar marmoset pair and baseline. We demonstrated that marmosets display enhanced affiliation with their pairmate following exposure to a same-sex marmoset, but not following exposure to an unfamiliar male-female marmoset pair. Thus, marmosets appear to utilize close proximity and physical contact with their pair-mate to buffer the potentially stressful experience of interacting with a same-sex stranger in a novel environment.