Presentation Title

Foliate Taste Bud Analysis following Chorda Tympani Nerve Transection in Adult Rats

Advisor Information

Suzanne Sollars

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

The tongue receives information about taste via small sensory organs, called taste buds, embedded in the surface epithelial tissue. Taste buds are segregated into distinct subpopulations. Foliate papillae are a discrete population of tissue located on the posterior sides of the tongue. These papillae have numerous taste buds contained in their trench-like folds. Nerves in the tongue relay sensory information to the brain and help sustain taste buds. The chorda tympani (CT) is a nerve that branches across the front two-thirds of the tongue, and the glossopharyngeal nerve is primarily associated with a different population of taste buds toward the back of the tongue. Foliate taste buds are innervated by both nerves. Surgical cuts of the CT (CTX), produce degeneration of anterior taste buds. Subsequent to nerve damage in adult rats, the taste buds regenerate after approximately 40 days. The effects of CTX on the posterior foliate taste buds are unknown. The present study is designed to examine possible degeneration of foliate taste buds following CTX, and will also examine if foliate taste buds regenerate subsequent to CT nerve regeneration. Sprague-Dawley rats received CTX at 50 days of age. The surgery was performed on one side of the tongue, leaving the other side undamaged for comparison. Tissue will be analyzed 8 days post CTX for degeneration, and 50 days post CTX for possible signs of regeneration. Based on previous studies of anterior taste buds, initial taste bud loss is expected followed by restoration of tissue structure.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Foliate Taste Bud Analysis following Chorda Tympani Nerve Transection in Adult Rats

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The tongue receives information about taste via small sensory organs, called taste buds, embedded in the surface epithelial tissue. Taste buds are segregated into distinct subpopulations. Foliate papillae are a discrete population of tissue located on the posterior sides of the tongue. These papillae have numerous taste buds contained in their trench-like folds. Nerves in the tongue relay sensory information to the brain and help sustain taste buds. The chorda tympani (CT) is a nerve that branches across the front two-thirds of the tongue, and the glossopharyngeal nerve is primarily associated with a different population of taste buds toward the back of the tongue. Foliate taste buds are innervated by both nerves. Surgical cuts of the CT (CTX), produce degeneration of anterior taste buds. Subsequent to nerve damage in adult rats, the taste buds regenerate after approximately 40 days. The effects of CTX on the posterior foliate taste buds are unknown. The present study is designed to examine possible degeneration of foliate taste buds following CTX, and will also examine if foliate taste buds regenerate subsequent to CT nerve regeneration. Sprague-Dawley rats received CTX at 50 days of age. The surgery was performed on one side of the tongue, leaving the other side undamaged for comparison. Tissue will be analyzed 8 days post CTX for degeneration, and 50 days post CTX for possible signs of regeneration. Based on previous studies of anterior taste buds, initial taste bud loss is expected followed by restoration of tissue structure.