Presentation Title

Comparison of gait variability among patients with PAD with no co-morbidities, PAD and ulcers, and PAD and diabetes

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have altered walking performance compared with healthy individuals. It is common for those with PAD to also have related pathologies, including diabetes or foot ulcers. These pathologies may greatly impact gait performance in patients. We hypothesize that patients with only PAD (PAD-O) will have differences in walking performance than those with PAD and diabetes (PAD-D) and also from patients with PAD and a foot ulcer (PAD-U). Walking performance measures included gait variability for the ankle, knee, and hip flexion/extension time series, six minute walk distance, and treadmill claudication times. Differences between all groups were detected using a one way ANOVA with a significance level of 0.05. There were significant main effects for knee and ankle coefficient of variation (p<0.046, p<0.008), ankle standard deviation (p<0.022), six minute walk test (p<0.014), initial claudication distance (ICD) (p<0.056), absolute claudication distance (ACD) (p<0.022), and Lyapunov exponent of the knee (p<0.053). The Tukey post-hoc test revealed that there were significant differences in the six minute walk, ICD, and ACD between PAD-O and PAD-D groups (p<0.017, p<0.043, p<0.017), and PAD-O and PAD-U (p<0.021, p<0.037, p<0.023). Patients with PAD and patients with PAD and co-morbidities had differences in ankle and knee coefficient of variation, ankle standard deviation, walking distance, and claudication distance. These results show physicians that diabetes and foot ulcers do affect gait. This is important in making better informed treatment prescriptions for these patients.

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Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Comparison of gait variability among patients with PAD with no co-morbidities, PAD and ulcers, and PAD and diabetes

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have altered walking performance compared with healthy individuals. It is common for those with PAD to also have related pathologies, including diabetes or foot ulcers. These pathologies may greatly impact gait performance in patients. We hypothesize that patients with only PAD (PAD-O) will have differences in walking performance than those with PAD and diabetes (PAD-D) and also from patients with PAD and a foot ulcer (PAD-U). Walking performance measures included gait variability for the ankle, knee, and hip flexion/extension time series, six minute walk distance, and treadmill claudication times. Differences between all groups were detected using a one way ANOVA with a significance level of 0.05. There were significant main effects for knee and ankle coefficient of variation (p<0.046, p<0.008), ankle standard deviation (p<0.022), six minute walk test (p<0.014), initial claudication distance (ICD) (p<0.056), absolute claudication distance (ACD) (p<0.022), and Lyapunov exponent of the knee (p<0.053). The Tukey post-hoc test revealed that there were significant differences in the six minute walk, ICD, and ACD between PAD-O and PAD-D groups (p<0.017, p<0.043, p<0.017), and PAD-O and PAD-U (p<0.021, p<0.037, p<0.023). Patients with PAD and patients with PAD and co-morbidities had differences in ankle and knee coefficient of variation, ankle standard deviation, walking distance, and claudication distance. These results show physicians that diabetes and foot ulcers do affect gait. This is important in making better informed treatment prescriptions for these patients.