Presentation Title

Gait Biomechanics In Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease Can Be Predicted By Quality Of Life Measures Using Stepwise Linear Regression

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

Physical activity induced pain, known as claudication, is the primary symptom of peripheral artery disease (PAD). Current functional assessments for patients with PAD patients are limited to physician observations. Quality of life (QOL) questionnaires and maximum walking distance tests are used in research settings and haven’t been compared with gait biomechanics. If there is a strong measure between research measures and gait biomechanics, clinicians may implement these methods in clinic. We hypothesized distances and QOL parameters would predict gait variables in patients with PAD. 106 subjects performed QOL questionnaires and walking distance tests. Statistical analysis included a stepwise linear regression using gait variables as dependents and QOL and walking distances as predictors. Models using QOL questionnaires and walking distances to predict values were significant in 31 of 33 gait parameters tested. The significant relationships had r-squared values ranging from .108 to .383, which are weak relationships. QOL questionnaires and walking distances can explain 10 – 40% of variance in gait biomechanics variables in patients with PAD. The 6MWT distances are the best representative of gait parameters of the QOL and walking distance parameters. These models may provide insight into functional status but are insufficient to describe the gait of the patients. Clinicians should be cautious in using only QOL or walking tests as measures of function. Future research should evaluate whether gait parameters through portable devices, such as accelerometers, are more representative of gait.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Gait Biomechanics In Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease Can Be Predicted By Quality Of Life Measures Using Stepwise Linear Regression

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Physical activity induced pain, known as claudication, is the primary symptom of peripheral artery disease (PAD). Current functional assessments for patients with PAD patients are limited to physician observations. Quality of life (QOL) questionnaires and maximum walking distance tests are used in research settings and haven’t been compared with gait biomechanics. If there is a strong measure between research measures and gait biomechanics, clinicians may implement these methods in clinic. We hypothesized distances and QOL parameters would predict gait variables in patients with PAD. 106 subjects performed QOL questionnaires and walking distance tests. Statistical analysis included a stepwise linear regression using gait variables as dependents and QOL and walking distances as predictors. Models using QOL questionnaires and walking distances to predict values were significant in 31 of 33 gait parameters tested. The significant relationships had r-squared values ranging from .108 to .383, which are weak relationships. QOL questionnaires and walking distances can explain 10 – 40% of variance in gait biomechanics variables in patients with PAD. The 6MWT distances are the best representative of gait parameters of the QOL and walking distance parameters. These models may provide insight into functional status but are insufficient to describe the gait of the patients. Clinicians should be cautious in using only QOL or walking tests as measures of function. Future research should evaluate whether gait parameters through portable devices, such as accelerometers, are more representative of gait.