Presentation Title

Gender differences in STEM workplace: reports of incivility

Advisor Information

Carey Ryan

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

3-3-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

3-3-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

STEM-educated college graduates, especially women, drop out of STEM careers at high rates (National Science Foundation, 2016), suggesting that their work experiences discourage them from remaining in STEM fields. The present study used mixed methods to examine recent STEM graduates’ (N=237; 55% male) reports of workplace incivility, which are low-intensity, ambiguous deviant behaviors (Cortina & Magley, 2009). We further distinguished between direct (e.g., aggression) and indirect (e.g., ignoring) experiences. Despite similarities in responses to an existing incivility measure, open-ended responses suggested that women experienced greater indirect incivility. Further, perceived cause of the incident depended on gender; men more often attributed incivility to being new, whereas more women cited problematic coworkers. In addition to the negative effect of indirect incivility on persistence for all workers, direct incivility more strongly related to lower persistence among women. These findings suggest that even low-level and ambiguous interpersonal situations might contribute to the “leaky pipeline” for women in STEM fields.

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Mar 3rd, 10:45 AM Mar 3rd, 12:00 PM

Gender differences in STEM workplace: reports of incivility

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

STEM-educated college graduates, especially women, drop out of STEM careers at high rates (National Science Foundation, 2016), suggesting that their work experiences discourage them from remaining in STEM fields. The present study used mixed methods to examine recent STEM graduates’ (N=237; 55% male) reports of workplace incivility, which are low-intensity, ambiguous deviant behaviors (Cortina & Magley, 2009). We further distinguished between direct (e.g., aggression) and indirect (e.g., ignoring) experiences. Despite similarities in responses to an existing incivility measure, open-ended responses suggested that women experienced greater indirect incivility. Further, perceived cause of the incident depended on gender; men more often attributed incivility to being new, whereas more women cited problematic coworkers. In addition to the negative effect of indirect incivility on persistence for all workers, direct incivility more strongly related to lower persistence among women. These findings suggest that even low-level and ambiguous interpersonal situations might contribute to the “leaky pipeline” for women in STEM fields.