Presenter Information

Sarah BakerFollow

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

3-3-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

3-3-2017 1:45 PM

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a cardiovascular disease manifesting blockages to arteries while limiting blood flow to the legs. Patients with PAD have pain/tingling in calves, thighs, and/or buttocks emanating by physical activity called intermittent claudication. PAD causes physical function limitations and increases cardiovascular morbidity by 3-6 times. PAD becomes particularly more prevalent with age. Patients with PAD walk differently than their healthy counterparts. Surgical revascularization to restore blood flow is the typical intervention, but whether walking patterns are restored following surgery has not been studied. This study compared walking patterns of patients with PAD at baseline and six-months post-revascularization. Ten patients were recruited from a local medical center and they visited the biomechanics laboratory prior to and six-months after surgical revascularization. Patients walked through a ten-meter walkway with an embedded force platform while ground reaction forces (600Hz; Kistler Instruments, USA) and lower extremity kinematics (60Hz; Motion Analysis Corp, USA) were recorded. The maximum distance individuals could walk was determined using the six-minute walk test. Inverse dynamics was used to calculate ankle plantarflexor moment and power at the end of stance phase (Visual 3D, C-Motion, Inc., USA). Differences between baseline and post revascularization were determined using paired t-tests (a=0.05). Maximum walking distance significantly increased post-surgery. No significant differences between baseline and six-months were detected for ankle powers or moments. Lack of functional training may prevent improvement of walking patterns and it may be necessary to include rehabilitation with functional exercises following surgical revascularization in patients with PAD.

Comments

Winner of Honorable Mention Graduate Poster Presentation

COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 12:30 PM Mar 3rd, 1:45 PM

Gait Biomechanics in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease After Revascularization

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a cardiovascular disease manifesting blockages to arteries while limiting blood flow to the legs. Patients with PAD have pain/tingling in calves, thighs, and/or buttocks emanating by physical activity called intermittent claudication. PAD causes physical function limitations and increases cardiovascular morbidity by 3-6 times. PAD becomes particularly more prevalent with age. Patients with PAD walk differently than their healthy counterparts. Surgical revascularization to restore blood flow is the typical intervention, but whether walking patterns are restored following surgery has not been studied. This study compared walking patterns of patients with PAD at baseline and six-months post-revascularization. Ten patients were recruited from a local medical center and they visited the biomechanics laboratory prior to and six-months after surgical revascularization. Patients walked through a ten-meter walkway with an embedded force platform while ground reaction forces (600Hz; Kistler Instruments, USA) and lower extremity kinematics (60Hz; Motion Analysis Corp, USA) were recorded. The maximum distance individuals could walk was determined using the six-minute walk test. Inverse dynamics was used to calculate ankle plantarflexor moment and power at the end of stance phase (Visual 3D, C-Motion, Inc., USA). Differences between baseline and post revascularization were determined using paired t-tests (a=0.05). Maximum walking distance significantly increased post-surgery. No significant differences between baseline and six-months were detected for ankle powers or moments. Lack of functional training may prevent improvement of walking patterns and it may be necessary to include rehabilitation with functional exercises following surgical revascularization in patients with PAD.