Presentation Title

The Stochastic Resonance paradigm - A means to restore sensation and function after lower limb loss?

Advisor Information

Nicholas Stergiou

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

3-3-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

3-3-2017 1:15 PM

Abstract

The Stochastic Resonance (SR) paradigm has shown promise in improving sensation and balance in individuals with peripheral neuropathy and in older adults. SR involves the application of sub-threshold noise (i.e. one that cannot in itself be perceived) that artificially enhances the perception of stimuli that would not normally be felt. The overarching aim of this study is to determine whether a subthreshold vibration, applied to the thigh of the affected leg, can improve sensation and balance in individuals with a lower limb amputation. We are testing two different types of noise signal - 'white noise' as would traditionally be used in this paradigm, and 'pink noise' which is a form that is more ubiquitous in natural structures and biological signals. If effective, this could provide a simple, non-invasive means to improve functional ability in people with amputation. Data collections are ongoing in the Biomechanics Research Building.

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COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 1:00 PM Mar 3rd, 1:15 PM

The Stochastic Resonance paradigm - A means to restore sensation and function after lower limb loss?

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

The Stochastic Resonance (SR) paradigm has shown promise in improving sensation and balance in individuals with peripheral neuropathy and in older adults. SR involves the application of sub-threshold noise (i.e. one that cannot in itself be perceived) that artificially enhances the perception of stimuli that would not normally be felt. The overarching aim of this study is to determine whether a subthreshold vibration, applied to the thigh of the affected leg, can improve sensation and balance in individuals with a lower limb amputation. We are testing two different types of noise signal - 'white noise' as would traditionally be used in this paradigm, and 'pink noise' which is a form that is more ubiquitous in natural structures and biological signals. If effective, this could provide a simple, non-invasive means to improve functional ability in people with amputation. Data collections are ongoing in the Biomechanics Research Building.