Presentation Title

Predictors of General Self-Worth Among Early Adolescents: Support, Competence, and Self-Construal

Advisor Information

Jonathan Santo

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

3-3-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

3-3-2017 10:45 AM

Abstract

Rationale: Because the self is a dynamic and ever changing cognitive and social entity, both internal and external factors must be considered when studying it. Moreover, given that adolescence is a time of great change, it is therefore a crucial period to study the self. One often studied factor, general self-worth, is a consistent correlate of adjustment. Among the external factors that greatly influence self-worth are support from parents and peers. Social and cognitive competence, on the other hand are internal factors influencing general self-worth. Self-construal is also considered as the way in which individuals identify themselves in regards to their social world. Support, competence, and self-construal can greatly influence general self-worth. The current study examined the mediating role of self-construal on the associations between parent and friend support and social and cognitive competence as correlates of self-worth among early adolescents in Montreal, Canada.

Method: Participants consisted of 430 fifth and sixth graders (Mage = 10.87, SD = 0.73; 222 female, 208 male) from 19 classes in three public elementary schools in Montreal, Canada. Measures included items from the Network of Relationships Inventory and were used to assess parental (3 items, α = .78) and friend support (3 items, α = .79), while a revised version of the Perceived Competence Scale for Children examined the factors of self-construal (6 items, α = .70), cognitive competence (3 items, α = .69), social competence (8 items, α = .70), and general self-worth (8 items, α = .74). Data was analyzed using structural equation modeling in M-Plus.

Results: There was a significant difference in measures of friend support between girls and boys, such that girls reported greater friend support. Girls also exhibited a more interdependent self-construal. Results indicated that parent and friend support were positively correlated and positively predicted a more interdependent self-construal. A more interdependent self-construal was positively associated with greater cognitive and social competence. Greater cognitive and social competence were positively correlated, and higher levels of both were associated with greater general self-worth. Self-construal served as a mediator between parent and friend support, and cognitive and social competence, which in turn predicted general self-worth. See Figure 1 for the full model. The model was also split by gender, though no significant differences between boys and girls were found.

Discussion: The findings indicate that support from parents and friends, self-perceived competence, as well as how early adolescents identify themselves in relation to their social world, all play a role in general self-worth. Future directions may include examinations of these variables in other contexts, such as more collectivistic cultures. The variables of social and cognitive competence may also be considered through the use of peer nominations, to study the perceptions of peers as well. The current results may also have implications for interventions aimed to increase general self-worth.

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COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 10:30 AM Mar 3rd, 10:45 AM

Predictors of General Self-Worth Among Early Adolescents: Support, Competence, and Self-Construal

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Rationale: Because the self is a dynamic and ever changing cognitive and social entity, both internal and external factors must be considered when studying it. Moreover, given that adolescence is a time of great change, it is therefore a crucial period to study the self. One often studied factor, general self-worth, is a consistent correlate of adjustment. Among the external factors that greatly influence self-worth are support from parents and peers. Social and cognitive competence, on the other hand are internal factors influencing general self-worth. Self-construal is also considered as the way in which individuals identify themselves in regards to their social world. Support, competence, and self-construal can greatly influence general self-worth. The current study examined the mediating role of self-construal on the associations between parent and friend support and social and cognitive competence as correlates of self-worth among early adolescents in Montreal, Canada.

Method: Participants consisted of 430 fifth and sixth graders (Mage = 10.87, SD = 0.73; 222 female, 208 male) from 19 classes in three public elementary schools in Montreal, Canada. Measures included items from the Network of Relationships Inventory and were used to assess parental (3 items, α = .78) and friend support (3 items, α = .79), while a revised version of the Perceived Competence Scale for Children examined the factors of self-construal (6 items, α = .70), cognitive competence (3 items, α = .69), social competence (8 items, α = .70), and general self-worth (8 items, α = .74). Data was analyzed using structural equation modeling in M-Plus.

Results: There was a significant difference in measures of friend support between girls and boys, such that girls reported greater friend support. Girls also exhibited a more interdependent self-construal. Results indicated that parent and friend support were positively correlated and positively predicted a more interdependent self-construal. A more interdependent self-construal was positively associated with greater cognitive and social competence. Greater cognitive and social competence were positively correlated, and higher levels of both were associated with greater general self-worth. Self-construal served as a mediator between parent and friend support, and cognitive and social competence, which in turn predicted general self-worth. See Figure 1 for the full model. The model was also split by gender, though no significant differences between boys and girls were found.

Discussion: The findings indicate that support from parents and friends, self-perceived competence, as well as how early adolescents identify themselves in relation to their social world, all play a role in general self-worth. Future directions may include examinations of these variables in other contexts, such as more collectivistic cultures. The variables of social and cognitive competence may also be considered through the use of peer nominations, to study the perceptions of peers as well. The current results may also have implications for interventions aimed to increase general self-worth.