Presentation Title

Efficient Variability: Linking Fractal Walking Patterns with Metabolic Energy Savings

Advisor Information

Kota Takahashi

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

3-3-2017 2:45 PM

End Date

3-3-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

During walking, humans tend to select a movement strategy that conserves the most metabolic energy. The ability to walk economically requires the optimization of a variety of factors, including changes in stride characteristics. While gross variation of strides is related to energy consumption, how this variation is organized from stride to stride may also contribute to metabolic economy. The purpose of this study is determine the relationship between metabolic energy consumption, stride variability, and stride-to-stride organization. By measuring stride length and gas exchange across a range of treadmill walking speeds, we will be investigating how the magnitude of stride length fluctuations relates to the organization of the fluctuations, and how these both relate to metabolic energy expenditure. We expect that both measures will be correlated with metabolic cost of transport, indicating that walking economically requires appropriate stride length maintenance and organization.

COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 2:45 PM Mar 3rd, 3:00 PM

Efficient Variability: Linking Fractal Walking Patterns with Metabolic Energy Savings

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

During walking, humans tend to select a movement strategy that conserves the most metabolic energy. The ability to walk economically requires the optimization of a variety of factors, including changes in stride characteristics. While gross variation of strides is related to energy consumption, how this variation is organized from stride to stride may also contribute to metabolic economy. The purpose of this study is determine the relationship between metabolic energy consumption, stride variability, and stride-to-stride organization. By measuring stride length and gas exchange across a range of treadmill walking speeds, we will be investigating how the magnitude of stride length fluctuations relates to the organization of the fluctuations, and how these both relate to metabolic energy expenditure. We expect that both measures will be correlated with metabolic cost of transport, indicating that walking economically requires appropriate stride length maintenance and organization.