Presentation Title

3D Printed Prostheses for Children: A Tool to Monitor Upper Limb Movement

Advisor Information

Jorge Zuniga

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

2-3-2018 3:30 PM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about 1,500 babies are born with upper limb reductions every year. Despite this high number of pediatric limb reductions, motor control and coordination in this population are still largely unexplored due to high cost and complex needs introduced by children’s small size, constant growth, and psychosocial development [1, 2].

The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the influence of upper-limb prostheses and prosthetic simulators on brain activity in the motor cortex and bimanual coordination compared to typically developing control children.

METHODS

Children with upper limb deficiencies (ULD) (n = 8) and typically developing, age- and sex- matched children (n = 8 controls, n = 8 prosthetic simulator users) performed reaching and gross motor tasks to assess function and brain activation.

Eight healthy controls performed functional tasks with their hands, and eight used a prosthesis simulator on their non-preferred hand. A timed bimanual reaching task was used to assess overall coordination, [3] and the “Box and Block” test determined overall manual gross dexterity. [2]

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Preliminary data from two subjects indicates that after using the prosthesis for 1 month, there was a reduction in movement duration for the affected hand using the prosthesis. This resulted in an increased synchrony between the affected (with prosthesis) and non-affected hands. This indicates that one month of practice with a prosthesis improved bimanual coordination during a functional bimanual motor task.

Comments

REFERENCES

1. Krebs DE, Edelstein JE & Thornby MA, Phys Ther, 71, 920-934, 1991.

2. Zuniga JM et al., BMC Res Notes, 8, 10, 2015.

3. Kilbreath SL et al., Disability and Rehabilitation, 1435, 2009.

4. Nishiyori R, Bisconti S & Ulrich B, Brain topography, 29(1), 42-55, 2016.

5. Imaizumi S, Asai T & Koyama S, Consciousness and Cognition, 45, 75-88, 2016.

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COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 2:15 PM Mar 2nd, 3:30 PM

3D Printed Prostheses for Children: A Tool to Monitor Upper Limb Movement

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

INTRODUCTION

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about 1,500 babies are born with upper limb reductions every year. Despite this high number of pediatric limb reductions, motor control and coordination in this population are still largely unexplored due to high cost and complex needs introduced by children’s small size, constant growth, and psychosocial development [1, 2].

The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the influence of upper-limb prostheses and prosthetic simulators on brain activity in the motor cortex and bimanual coordination compared to typically developing control children.

METHODS

Children with upper limb deficiencies (ULD) (n = 8) and typically developing, age- and sex- matched children (n = 8 controls, n = 8 prosthetic simulator users) performed reaching and gross motor tasks to assess function and brain activation.

Eight healthy controls performed functional tasks with their hands, and eight used a prosthesis simulator on their non-preferred hand. A timed bimanual reaching task was used to assess overall coordination, [3] and the “Box and Block” test determined overall manual gross dexterity. [2]

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Preliminary data from two subjects indicates that after using the prosthesis for 1 month, there was a reduction in movement duration for the affected hand using the prosthesis. This resulted in an increased synchrony between the affected (with prosthesis) and non-affected hands. This indicates that one month of practice with a prosthesis improved bimanual coordination during a functional bimanual motor task.