Presentation Title

That's Not How We Do It in My Department: An Investigation of Departmental Meeting Orientation

Presenter Information

Molly Grant-LeannaFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Joseph Allen

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

2-3-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

The present study investigates how organizational departments’ meeting orientation (organization’s stance toward meetings in terms of policies, procedures, and practices) influences meeting satisfaction and employee engagement. Meetings have an essential role in the workplace. The importance of meetings in large organizations are reinforced when employees spend more than 75% of their time engaging in meeting activities. In partnership with a large for-profit organization, 135 (43.4%) employees completed a 10-minute survey. Findings indicated that facets of meeting orientation were differentially related to employee attitudes. Department size negatively related to strategic use of meetings. This finding may be attributed to the type of work employees were performing. Employees who believed their department did not overuse meetings were more engaged in their work. When planning and organizing meetings, organizational leaders should stress to managers that using meetings for a clear, limited purpose is very important. Ongoing work will examine meeting orientation across multiple organizations.

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COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 10:45 AM Mar 2nd, 12:00 PM

That's Not How We Do It in My Department: An Investigation of Departmental Meeting Orientation

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The present study investigates how organizational departments’ meeting orientation (organization’s stance toward meetings in terms of policies, procedures, and practices) influences meeting satisfaction and employee engagement. Meetings have an essential role in the workplace. The importance of meetings in large organizations are reinforced when employees spend more than 75% of their time engaging in meeting activities. In partnership with a large for-profit organization, 135 (43.4%) employees completed a 10-minute survey. Findings indicated that facets of meeting orientation were differentially related to employee attitudes. Department size negatively related to strategic use of meetings. This finding may be attributed to the type of work employees were performing. Employees who believed their department did not overuse meetings were more engaged in their work. When planning and organizing meetings, organizational leaders should stress to managers that using meetings for a clear, limited purpose is very important. Ongoing work will examine meeting orientation across multiple organizations.