Presentation Title

Bridging the gap: individual relationships between long range correlations and dexterity in walking

Advisor Information

Vivien Marmelat

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

2-3-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

2-3-2018 9:45 AM

Abstract

Rhythmic and adaptable walking requires complex interactions within the locomotor system. Aging and disease modify these interactions and thus also modify walking behavior. Compared to young adults, older adults and people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) display both reduced rhythmicity during steady state walking and reduced adaptability in challenging walking conditions. Falls are common for elderly adults and even more so for people with PD resulting in high medical costs and reduced quality of life. Therefore, assessing an individual’s fall risk prior to falling is highly enticing. Because steady-state rhythmic walking and momentary walking adaptations both arise from the same global locomotor system, the rhythmicity of walking may provide insight into an individual’s walking adaptability during challenging conditions. We hypothesize that individuals with reduced rhythmicity will also show declined performance during challenging walking conditions. To examine this relationship, we will examine the walking of 10 young adults, 10 elderly adults, and 10 people with PD during 10 minutes of steady state walking and during obstacle crossing, a commonly encountered walking challenge. If individuals with reduced rhythmicity also display instability while crossing an obstacle, walking rhythmicity evaluations could become a key marker for evaluating fall risk.

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COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 9:30 AM Mar 2nd, 9:45 AM

Bridging the gap: individual relationships between long range correlations and dexterity in walking

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Rhythmic and adaptable walking requires complex interactions within the locomotor system. Aging and disease modify these interactions and thus also modify walking behavior. Compared to young adults, older adults and people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) display both reduced rhythmicity during steady state walking and reduced adaptability in challenging walking conditions. Falls are common for elderly adults and even more so for people with PD resulting in high medical costs and reduced quality of life. Therefore, assessing an individual’s fall risk prior to falling is highly enticing. Because steady-state rhythmic walking and momentary walking adaptations both arise from the same global locomotor system, the rhythmicity of walking may provide insight into an individual’s walking adaptability during challenging conditions. We hypothesize that individuals with reduced rhythmicity will also show declined performance during challenging walking conditions. To examine this relationship, we will examine the walking of 10 young adults, 10 elderly adults, and 10 people with PD during 10 minutes of steady state walking and during obstacle crossing, a commonly encountered walking challenge. If individuals with reduced rhythmicity also display instability while crossing an obstacle, walking rhythmicity evaluations could become a key marker for evaluating fall risk.