Presentation Title

The Bernies: How White Collar Criminals are Malevolently Creative

Advisor Information

Roni Reiter-Palmon

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

2-3-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

2-3-2018 9:15 AM

Abstract

Creativity is typically considered beneficial to society, and most of the research has focused on this pro-social side of creativity. However, the products of the creative process are not inherently good or bad. Individuals can generate a creative solution that has unintended negative consequences, and some individuals may even intentionally develop a solution to harm others. This latter type is considered malevolent creativity, or the use of an effective and novel solution to inflict harm or secure gains at others’ expense. A popular area of malevolent creativity research is within terror organizations; however, there are various arenas of crime where creativity emerges. A relatively understudied field, in terms of malevolent creativity, is white-collar crime. Financial crimes carried out by business or government professionals cost an estimated $300 billion dollars a year in loss. These white-collar crimes are motivated to obtain financial gain at the expense of others through deceit, violation of trust, and concealment. Using the framework of malevolent creativity, we can more holistically examine who, how, and why white-collar criminals and crime occur. In this presentation, I will propose a theoretical process model and outline future directions to study malevolent creativity in white-collar criminals.

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Mar 2nd, 9:00 AM Mar 2nd, 9:15 AM

The Bernies: How White Collar Criminals are Malevolently Creative

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Creativity is typically considered beneficial to society, and most of the research has focused on this pro-social side of creativity. However, the products of the creative process are not inherently good or bad. Individuals can generate a creative solution that has unintended negative consequences, and some individuals may even intentionally develop a solution to harm others. This latter type is considered malevolent creativity, or the use of an effective and novel solution to inflict harm or secure gains at others’ expense. A popular area of malevolent creativity research is within terror organizations; however, there are various arenas of crime where creativity emerges. A relatively understudied field, in terms of malevolent creativity, is white-collar crime. Financial crimes carried out by business or government professionals cost an estimated $300 billion dollars a year in loss. These white-collar crimes are motivated to obtain financial gain at the expense of others through deceit, violation of trust, and concealment. Using the framework of malevolent creativity, we can more holistically examine who, how, and why white-collar criminals and crime occur. In this presentation, I will propose a theoretical process model and outline future directions to study malevolent creativity in white-collar criminals.