Presentation Title

The Effects of Bobwhite and Pollinator Conservation on Grassland Songbirds in Nebraska

Presenter Information

Conor J. GearinFollow

Advisor Information

L. LaReesa Wolfenbarger, Ph.D., and John McCarty, Ph.D.

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

2-3-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

2-3-2018 10:15 AM

Abstract

Grassland bird populations are declining, and remaining grassland habitat areas often balance multiple goals. Many private lands in Nebraska are managed for the Northern Bobwhite, a gamebird, or for pollinator insect conservation. These management actions can also impact native grassland songbirds. I hypothesized that bobwhite and pollinator conservation fields in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) support higher densities of songbirds than other conservation fields with less diverse vegetation. Preliminary results from the first year of a two-year study indicate that fields managed for bobwhite or pollinators had higher densities of grassland obligate birds than did conservation fields not managed for a particular type of wildlife, suggesting there are overlaps in management goals. However, bobwhite density does not predict the density of obligate grassland bird density, suggesting that bobwhite management is not an inclusive model for all grassland species. The Ring-necked Pheasant was a better predictor of grassland bird occupancy and abundance, suggesting its conservation could benefit a broader group of grassland birds.

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Mar 2nd, 10:00 AM Mar 2nd, 10:15 AM

The Effects of Bobwhite and Pollinator Conservation on Grassland Songbirds in Nebraska

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Grassland bird populations are declining, and remaining grassland habitat areas often balance multiple goals. Many private lands in Nebraska are managed for the Northern Bobwhite, a gamebird, or for pollinator insect conservation. These management actions can also impact native grassland songbirds. I hypothesized that bobwhite and pollinator conservation fields in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) support higher densities of songbirds than other conservation fields with less diverse vegetation. Preliminary results from the first year of a two-year study indicate that fields managed for bobwhite or pollinators had higher densities of grassland obligate birds than did conservation fields not managed for a particular type of wildlife, suggesting there are overlaps in management goals. However, bobwhite density does not predict the density of obligate grassland bird density, suggesting that bobwhite management is not an inclusive model for all grassland species. The Ring-necked Pheasant was a better predictor of grassland bird occupancy and abundance, suggesting its conservation could benefit a broader group of grassland birds.