Presentation Title

Tolerance of Ambiguity and Self-Evaluations of Creativity

Advisor Information

Dr. Roni Reiter-Palmon

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

2-3-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

2-3-2018 1:15 PM

Abstract

In creativity research, tolerance for ambiguity has typically been evaluated in relation to divergent thinking measures, creative products, and self-evaluations of creative attitudes and behavior (Zenasni, Besancon, & Lubart, 2008). Tolerance of ambiguity refers to the way in which an individual approaches a situation which includes stimuli that is uncertain, unfamiliar, and complex. Tolerance of ambiguity has been found to positively relate to problem solving, possibly because individuals high in this trait experience ill-defined problems as exciting, desirable, and challenging, resulting in highly creative products (Furnham & Ribchester, 1995; Tegano, 1990). Creative self-efficacy and self-perceptions of creativity indicate the way individuals feel about their own creative abilities; specifically, how creative they would define themselves (Tierney & Farmer, 2002; Kaufman et al., 2010). Most studies involving tolerance of ambiguity and measures of creativity focus on linear relationships; however, one study in particular found a curvilinear relationship between tolerance of ambiguity and creativity, suggesting that we need to evaluate both linear and curvilinear relationships (Wang, Zhang, & Martocchio, 2011). The current research assesses two datasets that utilized tolerance of ambiguity and creativity measures. The first dataset consists of a sample of undergraduate students (N=215), and the second using an Mturk sample (N=221). Results from both studies show unique relationships using the quadratic term for tolerance of ambiguity. Curvilinear relationships were found between tolerance for ambiguity and two creativity measures, self-perception and self-efficacy (see Figure 1). The upward curve of this relationship shows that low levels of tolerance of ambiguity are predictive of both low creative self-perception and self-efficacy. The curvilinear relationship indicates that at low levels of tolerance for ambiguity, there is no relationship (or a small relationship) with creative self-efficacy and self-perceptions of creativity. However, once a threshold is reached (around mid-level) the relationship becomes more positive and stronger. These findings suggest that the relationship between tolerance of ambiguity and creative self-efficacy or perceptions of creativity are more complex than originally evaluated.

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Mar 2nd, 1:00 PM Mar 2nd, 1:15 PM

Tolerance of Ambiguity and Self-Evaluations of Creativity

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

In creativity research, tolerance for ambiguity has typically been evaluated in relation to divergent thinking measures, creative products, and self-evaluations of creative attitudes and behavior (Zenasni, Besancon, & Lubart, 2008). Tolerance of ambiguity refers to the way in which an individual approaches a situation which includes stimuli that is uncertain, unfamiliar, and complex. Tolerance of ambiguity has been found to positively relate to problem solving, possibly because individuals high in this trait experience ill-defined problems as exciting, desirable, and challenging, resulting in highly creative products (Furnham & Ribchester, 1995; Tegano, 1990). Creative self-efficacy and self-perceptions of creativity indicate the way individuals feel about their own creative abilities; specifically, how creative they would define themselves (Tierney & Farmer, 2002; Kaufman et al., 2010). Most studies involving tolerance of ambiguity and measures of creativity focus on linear relationships; however, one study in particular found a curvilinear relationship between tolerance of ambiguity and creativity, suggesting that we need to evaluate both linear and curvilinear relationships (Wang, Zhang, & Martocchio, 2011). The current research assesses two datasets that utilized tolerance of ambiguity and creativity measures. The first dataset consists of a sample of undergraduate students (N=215), and the second using an Mturk sample (N=221). Results from both studies show unique relationships using the quadratic term for tolerance of ambiguity. Curvilinear relationships were found between tolerance for ambiguity and two creativity measures, self-perception and self-efficacy (see Figure 1). The upward curve of this relationship shows that low levels of tolerance of ambiguity are predictive of both low creative self-perception and self-efficacy. The curvilinear relationship indicates that at low levels of tolerance for ambiguity, there is no relationship (or a small relationship) with creative self-efficacy and self-perceptions of creativity. However, once a threshold is reached (around mid-level) the relationship becomes more positive and stronger. These findings suggest that the relationship between tolerance of ambiguity and creative self-efficacy or perceptions of creativity are more complex than originally evaluated.