Advisor Information

Peter Szto, PhD

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

2-3-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

Abstract

Research findings are incorporated too slowly and inconsistently into social service practices. This gap between services and the research that informs them results in poorer outcomes for clients, and higher costs to taxpayers in the form of less effective treatments. Even evidence-based programs, if not delivered with fidelity to the research upon which they are based, can result in poor outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate solutions that support more rapid and effective implementation of research within agencies’ complex government, community, and organizational environments. The field of implementation science has emerged to study factors that influence full and effective use of research innovations in practice, and its systematic, robust models enable the analysis, design, and evaluation of processes to support and maintain high-fidelity implementation of evidence-based programs. Results have been promising; implementations of evidence-based programs using implementation science have improved the quality and quantity of client services compared with traditional programs. Implementation centers specialize in providing technical support to agencies adopting evidence-based programs into their practices. For example, the Evidence-based Prevention and Intervention Support Center (EPISCenter) is a 10-year partnership between Penn State University and Pennsylvania government agencies that has successfully connected research, policy, and practice. State governments have increasingly adopted evidence-based policymaking to spend tax dollars more effectively and improve community outcomes, and the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative provides implementation oversight research and other support to decision-makers. Implementation science is a critical tool that enables agencies to successfully navigate complexities inherent in transferring research to practice.

Comments

References

Clara, F., Garcia, K. Y., & Metz, A. (2017). Implementing evidence-based child welfare: The New York City experience. Casey Family Programs research report. Retrieved from https://www.casey.org/evidence-based-child-welfare-nyc/

Bertram, R. M. (2014). Program Implementation Frameworks. Encyclopedia of Social Work [online version]. National Association of Social Workers and Oxford University Press USA, 2016. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780199975839.013.949

Brekke, J. S., Ell, K., & Palinkas, L. A. (2007). Translational science at the National Institute of Mental Health: Can social work take its rightful place? Research on Social Work Practice, 17(1), 123-133. doi:10.1177/1049731506293693

Durlak, J. A. & DuPre, E. P., (2008). Implementation matters: A review of research on the influence of implementation on program outcomes and the factors affecting implementation. American Journal of Community Psychology, 41, 327-350. doi 10.1007/s10464-008-9165-0

Fixsen, D. L., Blase, K. A., Naoom, S. F., & Wallace, F. (2009). Core implementation components. Research on Social Work Practice, 19(5), 531–540.

Fixsen, D. L., Naoom, S. F., Blase, K. A., Friedman, R. M., & Wallace, F. (2005).

Implementation research: A synthesis of the literature. Core Implementation Components, 24-34. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, The National Implementation Research Network (FMHI Publication No. 231).

Graff, C. A., Springer, P., Bitar, G. W., Gee, R., & Arredondo, R. (2010). A purveyor team’s experience: Lessons learned from implementing a behavioral health care program in primary care settings. Families, Systems, & Health, 28(4), 356-368. doi 10.1037/a0021839

Henggeler, S. W., & Schoenwald, S. K. (2011). Evidence-based interventions for juvenile offenders and juvenile justice policies that support them. Society for Research in Child Development, 25(1), 2-20.

Murphy, N. F., Campbell-Patton, C. E., Hodges, S., Johnson, L., Sevcik, S., & Williams, A. (2017). Developmental Evaluation of Juvenile Justice Reform in Nebraska. Retrieved from https://supremecourt.nebraska.gov/sites/default/files/Programs/CIP/developmental_evaluation_jjhbi.pdf

National Implementation Research Network (NIRN), 2015. Implementation Science Defined. Website. Retrieved from http://nirn.fpg.unc.edu/learn-implementation/implementation-science-defined

Pew-MacArthur, (2014). Evidence-based policymaking: A guide for effective government. Report from the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/reports/2014/11/evidence-based-policymaking-a-guide-for-effective-government

Pew-MacArthur, (2016). Implementation oversight for evidence-based programs: A policymaker’s guide to effective program delivery. An issue brief from the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/issue-briefs/2016/05/implementation-oversight-for-evidence-based-programs

Pew-MacArthur, (2017). Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative. Website. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/projects/pew-macarthur-results-first-initiative/where-we-work

Pew Center on the States, (2012). Better programs, better results. Issue brief. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/assets/2012/07/26/pew_results_first_case_study.pdf

Rhoades, B. (2011). The role of a state-level prevention support system in high quality implementation and sustainability of evidence-based programs. Conference presentation: Prevention Research Center Seminar. Retrieved from http://www.episcenter.psu.edu/sites/default/files/EPISCenter%20as%20PSS_PRC%20Seminar%201-11-11.pdf

Voices for Children in Nebraska. (2012). Issue brief: Nebraska’s youth rehabilitation and treatment centers. Retrieved from http://voicesforchildren.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/YRTC-issue-brief.pdf

COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 10:45 AM Mar 2nd, 12:00 PM

Transforming Communities Through Policy: Bridging the Gap between what we know and what we do

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Abstract

Research findings are incorporated too slowly and inconsistently into social service practices. This gap between services and the research that informs them results in poorer outcomes for clients, and higher costs to taxpayers in the form of less effective treatments. Even evidence-based programs, if not delivered with fidelity to the research upon which they are based, can result in poor outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate solutions that support more rapid and effective implementation of research within agencies’ complex government, community, and organizational environments. The field of implementation science has emerged to study factors that influence full and effective use of research innovations in practice, and its systematic, robust models enable the analysis, design, and evaluation of processes to support and maintain high-fidelity implementation of evidence-based programs. Results have been promising; implementations of evidence-based programs using implementation science have improved the quality and quantity of client services compared with traditional programs. Implementation centers specialize in providing technical support to agencies adopting evidence-based programs into their practices. For example, the Evidence-based Prevention and Intervention Support Center (EPISCenter) is a 10-year partnership between Penn State University and Pennsylvania government agencies that has successfully connected research, policy, and practice. State governments have increasingly adopted evidence-based policymaking to spend tax dollars more effectively and improve community outcomes, and the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative provides implementation oversight research and other support to decision-makers. Implementation science is a critical tool that enables agencies to successfully navigate complexities inherent in transferring research to practice.