Advisor Information

Nicholas Stergiou

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

2-3-2018 1:45 PM

Abstract

Walking is the most common fall-related activity among older adults. Also, older adults experience greater step width variability when walking. Importantly, increased step width variability during walking has been found to be a strong predictor of fall risk and incidence. Therefore, an intervention for reducing increased step width variability may consequently reduce fall risk for older adults. In the present study, we proposed that lateral stepping training program improve walking in older adults by reducing the increased step width variability to normal values. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to determine the effect of a six-week lateral stepping training program on step width variability. Four older adults aged over 65 underwent an initial screening, walking for three-minutes at their self-selected comfortable walking speed (baseline speed) on a treadmill. Two older adults with abnormal levels of step width variability (> 0.029 m), and two older adults with normal levels of step width variability (< 0.029 m) were identified and underwent our lateral stepping training three times a week for six weeks. Results showed that the six-week lateral stepping intervention decreased step width variability to normal levels in the two older adults that were identified as having abnormal levels. Moreover, the new comfortable walking speed that the older adults chose after the six-week training was greater than the baseline walking speed. Walking speed also improved in the older adults with normal levels of step width variability. Their step width variability stayed within the normal levels.

Included in

Biomechanics Commons

COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 12:30 PM Mar 2nd, 1:45 PM

A Novel Task to Decrease Step Width Variability in Older Adults

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Walking is the most common fall-related activity among older adults. Also, older adults experience greater step width variability when walking. Importantly, increased step width variability during walking has been found to be a strong predictor of fall risk and incidence. Therefore, an intervention for reducing increased step width variability may consequently reduce fall risk for older adults. In the present study, we proposed that lateral stepping training program improve walking in older adults by reducing the increased step width variability to normal values. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to determine the effect of a six-week lateral stepping training program on step width variability. Four older adults aged over 65 underwent an initial screening, walking for three-minutes at their self-selected comfortable walking speed (baseline speed) on a treadmill. Two older adults with abnormal levels of step width variability (> 0.029 m), and two older adults with normal levels of step width variability (< 0.029 m) were identified and underwent our lateral stepping training three times a week for six weeks. Results showed that the six-week lateral stepping intervention decreased step width variability to normal levels in the two older adults that were identified as having abnormal levels. Moreover, the new comfortable walking speed that the older adults chose after the six-week training was greater than the baseline walking speed. Walking speed also improved in the older adults with normal levels of step width variability. Their step width variability stayed within the normal levels.