Presentation Title

Ignorance is Bliss, or is it? The Effects of Pay Transparency, Informational Justice, and Distributive Justice on Pay Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

Presenter Information

Eric SchellerFollow

Advisor Information

Wayne Harrison

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

2-3-2018 3:30 PM

Abstract

Pay transparency may help organizations reduce wage discrepancies while also increasing employees’ satisfaction with their pay and commitment to their organization. Informational and distributive justice may also play a role in these relationships. A 2 (Pay Transparency) X 2 (Informational Justice) X 2 (Distributive Justice) between-subjects factorial design was used to test the effects of these manipulations on pay satisfaction and commitment. A total of 293 participants completed the online survey. Employees experienced greater pay satisfaction and organizational commitment when their supervisors were more transparent regarding the organization's pay and when pay was equitable compared with others. Employees also experienced greater organizational commitment when their supervisors provided them with an explanation regarding the pay information being shared. In addition, pay transparency had a larger effect on pay satisfaction when distributive justice was low compared to high. Results found support that employees respond favorably to pay transparency.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 2:15 PM Mar 2nd, 3:30 PM

Ignorance is Bliss, or is it? The Effects of Pay Transparency, Informational Justice, and Distributive Justice on Pay Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Pay transparency may help organizations reduce wage discrepancies while also increasing employees’ satisfaction with their pay and commitment to their organization. Informational and distributive justice may also play a role in these relationships. A 2 (Pay Transparency) X 2 (Informational Justice) X 2 (Distributive Justice) between-subjects factorial design was used to test the effects of these manipulations on pay satisfaction and commitment. A total of 293 participants completed the online survey. Employees experienced greater pay satisfaction and organizational commitment when their supervisors were more transparent regarding the organization's pay and when pay was equitable compared with others. Employees also experienced greater organizational commitment when their supervisors provided them with an explanation regarding the pay information being shared. In addition, pay transparency had a larger effect on pay satisfaction when distributive justice was low compared to high. Results found support that employees respond favorably to pay transparency.