Presentation Title

Examining the Feasibility of Transparent Human Trafficking Data

Presenter Information

Gabrielle WethorFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Matt Hale

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

2-3-2018 1:45 PM

Abstract

Advances in computing and the development of the internet has proven to open up the doors of communication around the world. This remains true for everyday law-abiding citizens, but this concept is not lost on those who operate in criminal networks. Networks of criminals also are utilizing the internet to easily recruit, buy, and sell slaves online. The utilization of encrypted communication as well as the utilization of Bitcoin, allow for the private and untraceable sale of slaves. While reported cases of human trafficking continue to rise, many cases go largely unnoticed by those who wish to make an impact. Additionally, there is a lack of public awareness and understanding on this issue of modern day slavery. While groups working to combat human trafficking collect and obtain information on active cases of trafficking, this information is often kept on a need-to-know basis or requires a security clearance to review. In an effort to increase public awareness, this research examines the feasibility of transparency in data related to human trafficking.

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COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 12:30 PM Mar 2nd, 1:45 PM

Examining the Feasibility of Transparent Human Trafficking Data

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Advances in computing and the development of the internet has proven to open up the doors of communication around the world. This remains true for everyday law-abiding citizens, but this concept is not lost on those who operate in criminal networks. Networks of criminals also are utilizing the internet to easily recruit, buy, and sell slaves online. The utilization of encrypted communication as well as the utilization of Bitcoin, allow for the private and untraceable sale of slaves. While reported cases of human trafficking continue to rise, many cases go largely unnoticed by those who wish to make an impact. Additionally, there is a lack of public awareness and understanding on this issue of modern day slavery. While groups working to combat human trafficking collect and obtain information on active cases of trafficking, this information is often kept on a need-to-know basis or requires a security clearance to review. In an effort to increase public awareness, this research examines the feasibility of transparency in data related to human trafficking.