Presentation Title

DEVELOPMENT OF LOW COST 3D PRINTED ANATOMICAL MODELS FOR PRE-SURGICAL PLANNING

Presenter Information

David SalazarFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Jorge Zuniga

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

2-3-2018 1:45 PM

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a process of making a 3D solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model. Previous investigations have demonstrated the feasibility and utility of 3D printing in a wide range of subspecialties of medicine, such as the development of low-cost 3D prostheses. Modeling and printing techniques have also been used in the development of various anatomical structures. The goal of this research is to develop and publish a low-cost methodology of how to develop low cost anatomical models for pre-surgical planning of highly complex surgeries.

In order to produce the models, a 3D representation of the structure must be created with a specified software, and then printed by a 3D printer. To compare the different model possibilities, structures will be prepared by 2 different types of software (industrial and open-source), and 3 different types of printers (high end, intermediate level, and low-cost), resulting in a total of 6 different models.

In a blind preliminary analysis of the 3D printed models, a licensed radiologist was asked to review each of the models and determine which model he felt to be a “better representation of the region of interest”. His observation found that the models printed by the free open-source software were preferred to those prepared by the industrial software. Additionally, our methodology resulted in a significant cost reduction from $30,000 to $1,000. The cost estimations are rough approximations of the software, equipment, and materials.

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COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 12:30 PM Mar 2nd, 1:45 PM

DEVELOPMENT OF LOW COST 3D PRINTED ANATOMICAL MODELS FOR PRE-SURGICAL PLANNING

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a process of making a 3D solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model. Previous investigations have demonstrated the feasibility and utility of 3D printing in a wide range of subspecialties of medicine, such as the development of low-cost 3D prostheses. Modeling and printing techniques have also been used in the development of various anatomical structures. The goal of this research is to develop and publish a low-cost methodology of how to develop low cost anatomical models for pre-surgical planning of highly complex surgeries.

In order to produce the models, a 3D representation of the structure must be created with a specified software, and then printed by a 3D printer. To compare the different model possibilities, structures will be prepared by 2 different types of software (industrial and open-source), and 3 different types of printers (high end, intermediate level, and low-cost), resulting in a total of 6 different models.

In a blind preliminary analysis of the 3D printed models, a licensed radiologist was asked to review each of the models and determine which model he felt to be a “better representation of the region of interest”. His observation found that the models printed by the free open-source software were preferred to those prepared by the industrial software. Additionally, our methodology resulted in a significant cost reduction from $30,000 to $1,000. The cost estimations are rough approximations of the software, equipment, and materials.