Presentation Title

Foot thermal response to shear forces during turning

Advisor Information

Kota Takahashi

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

1-3-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

1-3-2019 1:45 PM

Abstract

Foot temperature regulation is a crucial aspect of maintaining structural integrity of the foot. In fact, significant differences between pre- and post-activity temperatures have been reported. Though this may not pose a problem for healthy adults, high temperature within individuals with neurological and/or vascular impairments has been reported to be a major factor in diabetic foot ulcer occurrence. However, the mechanistic property responsible for this increase in heat production within the foot during walking is currently unclear. The foot-to-ground interaction may be a good predictor of the temperature increase seen within the foot. Specifically, the horizontal forces (shear) may reflect direct changes in foot temperature. In fact, shear has been demonstrated to be related to temperature change within the foot. Though the relationship between shear and temperature has been shown, study design limitations of previous work has prevented application of these results in a broader population. Turning gait may be one way of inducing different levels of shear to allow for appropriate investigation of the effect of shear on temperature change in foot tissue.

The purpose of this study is to provide insight into the thermal-shear relationship within the foot during turning. It is expected that temperature change within the foot will be related to shear magnitude. We also hypothesize that the external limb will experience greater levels of shear compared to the internal leg, relative to the path of progression.

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COinS
 
Mar 1st, 12:30 PM Mar 1st, 1:45 PM

Foot thermal response to shear forces during turning

Foot temperature regulation is a crucial aspect of maintaining structural integrity of the foot. In fact, significant differences between pre- and post-activity temperatures have been reported. Though this may not pose a problem for healthy adults, high temperature within individuals with neurological and/or vascular impairments has been reported to be a major factor in diabetic foot ulcer occurrence. However, the mechanistic property responsible for this increase in heat production within the foot during walking is currently unclear. The foot-to-ground interaction may be a good predictor of the temperature increase seen within the foot. Specifically, the horizontal forces (shear) may reflect direct changes in foot temperature. In fact, shear has been demonstrated to be related to temperature change within the foot. Though the relationship between shear and temperature has been shown, study design limitations of previous work has prevented application of these results in a broader population. Turning gait may be one way of inducing different levels of shear to allow for appropriate investigation of the effect of shear on temperature change in foot tissue.

The purpose of this study is to provide insight into the thermal-shear relationship within the foot during turning. It is expected that temperature change within the foot will be related to shear magnitude. We also hypothesize that the external limb will experience greater levels of shear compared to the internal leg, relative to the path of progression.