Presentation Title

The Effect of a Novel Task Intervention on Gait Variability and Balance in Older Adults

Presenter Information

ANDREAS SKIADOPOULOSFollow

Advisor Information

Nicholas Stergiou

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

1-3-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

1-3-2019 3:15 PM

Abstract

Interventions to prevent falls have been a major focus of research in recent years. We propose that older adults can reduce gait variability and improve performance in common clinical measures of balance by performing a lateral stepping gait training. Fourteen older adults aged 65+ (3m; age: 70 ± 3 yrs.; height: 166.1 ± 10.9 cm; mass: 72.6 ± 12.6 kg) underwent a six-week lateral stepping training 3-days/week. Gait variability and performance in common clinical balance tests were measured before, after completion of the training, and six weeks following completion. The lateral stepping training improved older adults’ performance in the clinical tests of balance and speed, and the effects were retained for six weeks after the completion of the intervention. Moreover, the six-week intervention significantly decreased step-width variability in older adults, and the effects were retained for six weeks after the completion of the intervention. Variability of stride-time, stance-time, and step-length showed a decreasing trend after the intervention, although not statistically significant. Importantly, variability decreased significantly for all parameters from baseline at retention assessment. These results demonstrated the feasibility of the intervention to reduce gait variability and to improve balance in older adults.

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Mar 1st, 2:00 PM Mar 1st, 3:15 PM

The Effect of a Novel Task Intervention on Gait Variability and Balance in Older Adults

Interventions to prevent falls have been a major focus of research in recent years. We propose that older adults can reduce gait variability and improve performance in common clinical measures of balance by performing a lateral stepping gait training. Fourteen older adults aged 65+ (3m; age: 70 ± 3 yrs.; height: 166.1 ± 10.9 cm; mass: 72.6 ± 12.6 kg) underwent a six-week lateral stepping training 3-days/week. Gait variability and performance in common clinical balance tests were measured before, after completion of the training, and six weeks following completion. The lateral stepping training improved older adults’ performance in the clinical tests of balance and speed, and the effects were retained for six weeks after the completion of the intervention. Moreover, the six-week intervention significantly decreased step-width variability in older adults, and the effects were retained for six weeks after the completion of the intervention. Variability of stride-time, stance-time, and step-length showed a decreasing trend after the intervention, although not statistically significant. Importantly, variability decreased significantly for all parameters from baseline at retention assessment. These results demonstrated the feasibility of the intervention to reduce gait variability and to improve balance in older adults.