Presentation Title

The Effect of Role Demands on Emotional Eating and Sleep Quality and Quantity

Presenter Information

Lilly L. KegleyFollow

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer, PhD.

Location

Criss Library Room 112

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

1-3-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

1-3-2019 10:15 AM

Abstract

Title; The Effect of Role Demands on Emotional Eating and Sleep Quality and Quantity

Kegley, L. , & Scherer, L.L. (2019)

College students are becoming increasingly more stressed, in part due to the amount of role demands being placed on students (Huie, Kitsantas, Winsler, 2010, p. 110) . Increasingly college students are undertaking an exhaustive course load and maintaining fulltime employment. A study conducted by King (2006) claims that approximately 80% of students work while enrolled in courses, explaining that expenses such as tuition, university fees, and cost of living as reasons to increase work hours. While many students have positive coping skills combating stress, there are still students who frequently use negative coping skills when dealing with stress. These negative skills can include drinking, drugs, and emotional eating. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect physical activity has in reducing the effect of role demands on emotional-eating. Emotional eating can be defined as “the tendency to overeat in response to negative emotions such as anxiety or irritability” (van Strien et al., 2007, p.106).Engaging in emotional-eating has several negative outcomes such as weight gain and poor self-esteem. This study will examine the effect that physical activity has in relation to role hours on the individual’s predisposition to emotional eating. Total role demands were operationalized as the total number of hours spent fulfilling various life roles including the roles of students, employee, and personal time. We predicted that those students higher in total role hours will be significantly less likely to emotionally-eat when engaging in a higher levels of physical activity than a lower level of physical activity; no difference in emotional eating was expected for individuals lower in role hours regardless of level of physical activity they engaged in. Practical implications for reaching out to students struggling with emotional eating issues and helping them develop more effective coping skills will be discussed.

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Mar 1st, 9:00 AM Mar 1st, 10:15 AM

The Effect of Role Demands on Emotional Eating and Sleep Quality and Quantity

Criss Library Room 112

Title; The Effect of Role Demands on Emotional Eating and Sleep Quality and Quantity

Kegley, L. , & Scherer, L.L. (2019)

College students are becoming increasingly more stressed, in part due to the amount of role demands being placed on students (Huie, Kitsantas, Winsler, 2010, p. 110) . Increasingly college students are undertaking an exhaustive course load and maintaining fulltime employment. A study conducted by King (2006) claims that approximately 80% of students work while enrolled in courses, explaining that expenses such as tuition, university fees, and cost of living as reasons to increase work hours. While many students have positive coping skills combating stress, there are still students who frequently use negative coping skills when dealing with stress. These negative skills can include drinking, drugs, and emotional eating. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect physical activity has in reducing the effect of role demands on emotional-eating. Emotional eating can be defined as “the tendency to overeat in response to negative emotions such as anxiety or irritability” (van Strien et al., 2007, p.106).Engaging in emotional-eating has several negative outcomes such as weight gain and poor self-esteem. This study will examine the effect that physical activity has in relation to role hours on the individual’s predisposition to emotional eating. Total role demands were operationalized as the total number of hours spent fulfilling various life roles including the roles of students, employee, and personal time. We predicted that those students higher in total role hours will be significantly less likely to emotionally-eat when engaging in a higher levels of physical activity than a lower level of physical activity; no difference in emotional eating was expected for individuals lower in role hours regardless of level of physical activity they engaged in. Practical implications for reaching out to students struggling with emotional eating issues and helping them develop more effective coping skills will be discussed.