Presentation Title

Experiences of Dysphoria and Desire for Medical Transition Among Nonbinary Trans Individuals

Presenter Information

Gina ComstockFollow

Advisor Information

Jay Irwin

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

1-3-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

1-3-2019 12:00 PM

Abstract

Gender dysphoria (GD) is defined as significant distress experienced from conflict between a person’s gender identity and their assigned gender (American Psychological Association 2013). Dysphoria is well documented in trans individuals, and both medical and non-medical methods of transition can be undertaken to help alleviate GD and create feelings of gender-affirmation. Presently, little quantitative data exists regarding experiences of dysphoria or transition among binary trans individuals, and no such data exists for individuals with non-binary gender identities.

This study aimed to document and examine rates of dysphoria and desire for transition in nonbinary individuals as well as how their experiences differ from those of binary trans folks. Participants (N=439) completed an online questionnaire featuring modified Utrecht Gender Dysphoria Scales (mUGDS) and questions regarding transition desires. Statistics were performed on mUGDS data to analyze for variation by binary vs. nonbinary gender and gender classification (masculine, neutral/neither, or feminine).

Results reported significant main effects of binary/nonbinary gender, gender classification, and interaction of the two for both AMAB and AFAB participants: binary trans participants had greater rates of GD than nonbinary participants (both pNB Masc/Femme > NB Neutral/Neither. Data for transition desires is also reported by the same categories.

This study gathered the first quantitative record of experiences of dysphoria and desire for medical transition in nonbinary trans individuals, and found significant variation in experiences between binary and nonbinary trans folks, masculine/feminine-aligned and neutral nonbinary folks, and by assigned gender/sex at birth. Further studies should investigate the variation of GD severity and frequency within individuals, differences in GD across age groups and cultures, and ultimately seek to create a more nuanced, trans-friendly measure of dysphoria.

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Mar 1st, 10:45 AM Mar 1st, 12:00 PM

Experiences of Dysphoria and Desire for Medical Transition Among Nonbinary Trans Individuals

Gender dysphoria (GD) is defined as significant distress experienced from conflict between a person’s gender identity and their assigned gender (American Psychological Association 2013). Dysphoria is well documented in trans individuals, and both medical and non-medical methods of transition can be undertaken to help alleviate GD and create feelings of gender-affirmation. Presently, little quantitative data exists regarding experiences of dysphoria or transition among binary trans individuals, and no such data exists for individuals with non-binary gender identities.

This study aimed to document and examine rates of dysphoria and desire for transition in nonbinary individuals as well as how their experiences differ from those of binary trans folks. Participants (N=439) completed an online questionnaire featuring modified Utrecht Gender Dysphoria Scales (mUGDS) and questions regarding transition desires. Statistics were performed on mUGDS data to analyze for variation by binary vs. nonbinary gender and gender classification (masculine, neutral/neither, or feminine).

Results reported significant main effects of binary/nonbinary gender, gender classification, and interaction of the two for both AMAB and AFAB participants: binary trans participants had greater rates of GD than nonbinary participants (both pNB Masc/Femme > NB Neutral/Neither. Data for transition desires is also reported by the same categories.

This study gathered the first quantitative record of experiences of dysphoria and desire for medical transition in nonbinary trans individuals, and found significant variation in experiences between binary and nonbinary trans folks, masculine/feminine-aligned and neutral nonbinary folks, and by assigned gender/sex at birth. Further studies should investigate the variation of GD severity and frequency within individuals, differences in GD across age groups and cultures, and ultimately seek to create a more nuanced, trans-friendly measure of dysphoria.