Presentation Title

Foot Thermal Response to Shear Force Magnitude During Turning Gait

Advisor Information

Kota Z. Takahashi

Location

MBSC 201

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2020 12:30 PM

End Date

6-3-2020 1:45 PM

Abstract

Studies on healthy adults have demonstrated that during walking, foot temperature increases from pre- to post-activity. Though this is not a problem for healthy adults, potential consequences may arise for those unable to maintain desired thermal state within the foot. The mechanistic property responsible for this increase in heat production within the foot, is unclear. The foot-to-ground interaction may be a good predictor; specifically, shear may reflect direct changes. Shear has been demonstrated to be related to temperature change. Though the relationship between shear and temperature has been shown, study design limitations of previous work have prevented application of these results in a broader population. Turning gait may be one way of inducing different levels of shear to allow for appropriate investigation of the effect of shear on temperature change. The purpose of this study was to investigate the thermal response of the foot to varying magnitudes of shear forces during barefoot curved-path toe-walking. We hypothesized that foot temperature increase would be related to a greater shear force and the external foot would experience greater shear and have a higher temperature increase compared to the internal foot. To investigate this relationship, we had subjects walk barefoot on their toes for 5 minutes at a speed of 1.0 m/s for three different radii. Our first hypothesis was supported as shear was positively associated with temperature increase. Our second hypothesis was partially supported as shear magnitude was higher in the external limb, but temperature was not significantly different.

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Mar 6th, 12:30 PM Mar 6th, 1:45 PM

Foot Thermal Response to Shear Force Magnitude During Turning Gait

MBSC 201

Studies on healthy adults have demonstrated that during walking, foot temperature increases from pre- to post-activity. Though this is not a problem for healthy adults, potential consequences may arise for those unable to maintain desired thermal state within the foot. The mechanistic property responsible for this increase in heat production within the foot, is unclear. The foot-to-ground interaction may be a good predictor; specifically, shear may reflect direct changes. Shear has been demonstrated to be related to temperature change. Though the relationship between shear and temperature has been shown, study design limitations of previous work have prevented application of these results in a broader population. Turning gait may be one way of inducing different levels of shear to allow for appropriate investigation of the effect of shear on temperature change. The purpose of this study was to investigate the thermal response of the foot to varying magnitudes of shear forces during barefoot curved-path toe-walking. We hypothesized that foot temperature increase would be related to a greater shear force and the external foot would experience greater shear and have a higher temperature increase compared to the internal foot. To investigate this relationship, we had subjects walk barefoot on their toes for 5 minutes at a speed of 1.0 m/s for three different radii. Our first hypothesis was supported as shear was positively associated with temperature increase. Our second hypothesis was partially supported as shear magnitude was higher in the external limb, but temperature was not significantly different.