Presentation Title

Singing for Our Lives: The Motivations of Millennials in Queer Choruses

Presenter Information

Kerrin PackardFollow

Advisor Information

Jay Irwin

Location

MBSC 304

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2020 10:30 AM

End Date

6-3-2020 11:45 AM

Abstract

The majority of social scientists report that it is more socially acceptable to be an out queer person than ever before, often citing the Pew Research Center’s report of the climbing rate of Americans in favor of same-sex marriage (2015). If this is the case, why has membership in Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, or SOGI, affirmative choruses grown, not diminished or remained static? This study examines the motivations of Millennials for joining and remaining members of queer choruses, as they are poised to become the next social majority as preceding generations move on in their life course. Specifically, it explores how human capital, such as talents, abilities, and individual identities, can be used to gain entrée into a formal group and transmuted into social capital, which grows along with one’s social network. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 15 singers from three queer mixed choruses in metropolitan cities across America. Participants were asked about their identities as a member of the SOGI community, as an individual and an advocate, and their identity as a musician. They were also asked about their social experiences with their chorus and the quality of their relationships with other members and the organization itself. Themes for membership included: the ability to comfortably perform the self, repertoire, interpersonal relationships, and the shared emotional experience of performing with their chorus.

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Mar 6th, 10:30 AM Mar 6th, 11:45 AM

Singing for Our Lives: The Motivations of Millennials in Queer Choruses

MBSC 304

The majority of social scientists report that it is more socially acceptable to be an out queer person than ever before, often citing the Pew Research Center’s report of the climbing rate of Americans in favor of same-sex marriage (2015). If this is the case, why has membership in Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, or SOGI, affirmative choruses grown, not diminished or remained static? This study examines the motivations of Millennials for joining and remaining members of queer choruses, as they are poised to become the next social majority as preceding generations move on in their life course. Specifically, it explores how human capital, such as talents, abilities, and individual identities, can be used to gain entrée into a formal group and transmuted into social capital, which grows along with one’s social network. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 15 singers from three queer mixed choruses in metropolitan cities across America. Participants were asked about their identities as a member of the SOGI community, as an individual and an advocate, and their identity as a musician. They were also asked about their social experiences with their chorus and the quality of their relationships with other members and the organization itself. Themes for membership included: the ability to comfortably perform the self, repertoire, interpersonal relationships, and the shared emotional experience of performing with their chorus.