Presentation Title

Mineral Densities of Hydroponically Grown and Soil Grown Kale

Advisor Information

Karen Murch-Shafer

Location

MBSC 222

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2020 10:15 AM

Abstract

There are few studies that compare mineral densities of plants that are yielded from hydroponic systems to plants that are grown in soil. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are differences in plant characteristics such as height, leaf count, wet weight, and dry weight when comparing kale grown in soil and in a hydroponics system. The study also analyzed if there are nutritional differences between the plants grown in the two mediums. The plant levels of the four key minerals, calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium, that are necessary for a healthy human diet were assessed to determine possible nutritional variations. Samples of the soil and water were taken to examine mineral quantities the kale plants might be taking from their growing medium. The findings from this study can be used at food distribution centers, such as food pantries, looking to provide the most nutritional foods to those facing food insecurity by using the most effective growth methods available.

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Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:15 AM

Mineral Densities of Hydroponically Grown and Soil Grown Kale

MBSC 222

There are few studies that compare mineral densities of plants that are yielded from hydroponic systems to plants that are grown in soil. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are differences in plant characteristics such as height, leaf count, wet weight, and dry weight when comparing kale grown in soil and in a hydroponics system. The study also analyzed if there are nutritional differences between the plants grown in the two mediums. The plant levels of the four key minerals, calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium, that are necessary for a healthy human diet were assessed to determine possible nutritional variations. Samples of the soil and water were taken to examine mineral quantities the kale plants might be taking from their growing medium. The findings from this study can be used at food distribution centers, such as food pantries, looking to provide the most nutritional foods to those facing food insecurity by using the most effective growth methods available.