Presentation Title

Difficulty of Conversation Topics May Influence Dual-Task Cost of Gait

Presenter Information

Kyle DoerrFollow

Advisor Information

Jenna Yentes

Location

MBSC 201

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2020 12:30 PM

End Date

6-3-2020 1:45 PM

Abstract

Contributions of Individual Differences and Context on Dual-Task Performance in Adults: Maintaining Independence and Well-Being in Older Adulthood

Kyle Doerr1, Hyeon Jung Kim2,Farahnaz Fallah Tafti1, Dawn Venema3, Julie Blaskewicz Boron2, Jennifer Yentes1

1Department of Biomechanics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE USA

2Department of Gerontology, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE USA

3Physical Therapy Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE USA

email: kldoerr@unomaha.edu

Presentation Preference: Poster only

INTRODUCTION

The relationship between cognitive function and movement has been well established [1], as has decreased cognitive and motor performance of older adults when tested in dual-task (DT) paradigms. DT ability, often defined as the ability to engage in two motor and/or cognitive tasks at the same time, is essential for performing daily tasks such as cooking and navigating environments when walking. A decrease in cognitive abilities associated with older age have been linked to falls and fall risk [2, 3]. Walking while talking is a common everyday DT activity, however, when people are in their homes, or other common environments, they may not use appropriate caution, putting them at higher risk of neglecting the primary task, walking. Currently, the literature is sparse on ecologically valid DT paradigms. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to begin to address these gaps by investigating the dual-task cost of gait in older adults while having a telephone conversation compared to dual-task cost in younger adults under the same given conditions. Gait of older adults has been found to be more affected by DT paradigms than their younger counterparts [4, 5], potentially due to a deficit in attention allocation, gait requiring additional attention, and/or a decline in cognitive resources. Talking on the phone is an ecologically valid task that is performed on a regular basis. It has been hypothesized that older adults will demonstrate a greater dual-task cost of gait while talking on the telephone compared to healthy, young adults.

METHODS

This project is going to include a total of 20 subjects recruited from the community; 10 healthy young control subjects (19-30 years old) and 10 subjects healthy older individuals (70 years and older). Participants will be screened for conditions that may confound the results such as neuromuscular disorders and difficulty hearing. Participants are deemed eligible based off a health history form and an audiometry test. Participants attend two visits within 15 business days of each other. During visit 1, subjects will be consented, screened for participation, participate in a hearing test, complete physical activity and cognitive questionnaires, and engage in telephone conversation via cell phone while seated. During visit two, subjects will go through two randomized walking conditions. The two walking conditions are walking only or walking and participating in a conversation on a cell phone. In regard to conversations, subjects will be asked to rank their preference in the conversation topics from least favorite to favorite topic. Two conversations will be conducted per visit, each lasting three minutes long with a break of at least five minutes in between the two conversation increments. Conversations will be recorded for transcription and analysis at a later date. For the walking conditions, subjects are asked to walk three minutes under two randomly presented conditions: 1) walking only or 2) walking while having a phone conversation. When performing walking conditions, subjects are asked to walk around the perimeter (roughly 100 feet total) of the laboratory continuously for three minutes at a self-selected pace. A pressure-sensing walkway is positioned along one side of the room to record their steps and provide information regarding gait speed, step length, timing, and width. Gait data will be averaged within each walking bout. The following equation will be used to calculate dual-task cost (DTC):

DTC = ((DT – ST)/ST) * 100.

where DT is dual task condition and ST is the single task condition. A positive DTC value would indicate a benefit and a negative DTC value would indicate a cost. The group mean differences in dual-task cost will be calculated using an independent t-test.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Data collections for this project are still on-going and will be completed in time to present at this conference. Therefore, results and discussion are unavailable at this time.

REFERENCES

1. Montero-Odasso, M., et al., Gait and Cognition: A Complementary Approach to Understanding Brain Function and he Risk of Falling. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2012. 60(11): p. 2127-2136.

2. Springer S, Giladi N, Peretz C, Yogev G, Simon ES, Hausdorff JM. Dual-tasking effects on gait variability: the role of aging, falls, and executive function. Mov Disord. 2006;21:950-957.

3. Yogev-Seligmann G, Hausdorff JM, Giladi N. The role of executive function and attention in gait. Mov Disord. 2008;23:42; quiz 472.

4. Woollacott M, Shumway-Cook A. Attention and the control of posture and gait: a review of an emerging area of research. Gait Posture. 2002;16:1-14.

5. Lundin-Olsson L, Nyberg L, Gustafson Y. "Stops walking when talking" as a predictor of falls in elderly people. Lancet. 1997;349:2.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Funding provided by the NU Collaboration Planning Grant (JBB) and UNO FUSE (KD

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 12:30 PM Mar 6th, 1:45 PM

Difficulty of Conversation Topics May Influence Dual-Task Cost of Gait

MBSC 201

Contributions of Individual Differences and Context on Dual-Task Performance in Adults: Maintaining Independence and Well-Being in Older Adulthood

Kyle Doerr1, Hyeon Jung Kim2,Farahnaz Fallah Tafti1, Dawn Venema3, Julie Blaskewicz Boron2, Jennifer Yentes1

1Department of Biomechanics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE USA

2Department of Gerontology, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE USA

3Physical Therapy Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE USA

email: kldoerr@unomaha.edu

Presentation Preference: Poster only

INTRODUCTION

The relationship between cognitive function and movement has been well established [1], as has decreased cognitive and motor performance of older adults when tested in dual-task (DT) paradigms. DT ability, often defined as the ability to engage in two motor and/or cognitive tasks at the same time, is essential for performing daily tasks such as cooking and navigating environments when walking. A decrease in cognitive abilities associated with older age have been linked to falls and fall risk [2, 3]. Walking while talking is a common everyday DT activity, however, when people are in their homes, or other common environments, they may not use appropriate caution, putting them at higher risk of neglecting the primary task, walking. Currently, the literature is sparse on ecologically valid DT paradigms. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to begin to address these gaps by investigating the dual-task cost of gait in older adults while having a telephone conversation compared to dual-task cost in younger adults under the same given conditions. Gait of older adults has been found to be more affected by DT paradigms than their younger counterparts [4, 5], potentially due to a deficit in attention allocation, gait requiring additional attention, and/or a decline in cognitive resources. Talking on the phone is an ecologically valid task that is performed on a regular basis. It has been hypothesized that older adults will demonstrate a greater dual-task cost of gait while talking on the telephone compared to healthy, young adults.

METHODS

This project is going to include a total of 20 subjects recruited from the community; 10 healthy young control subjects (19-30 years old) and 10 subjects healthy older individuals (70 years and older). Participants will be screened for conditions that may confound the results such as neuromuscular disorders and difficulty hearing. Participants are deemed eligible based off a health history form and an audiometry test. Participants attend two visits within 15 business days of each other. During visit 1, subjects will be consented, screened for participation, participate in a hearing test, complete physical activity and cognitive questionnaires, and engage in telephone conversation via cell phone while seated. During visit two, subjects will go through two randomized walking conditions. The two walking conditions are walking only or walking and participating in a conversation on a cell phone. In regard to conversations, subjects will be asked to rank their preference in the conversation topics from least favorite to favorite topic. Two conversations will be conducted per visit, each lasting three minutes long with a break of at least five minutes in between the two conversation increments. Conversations will be recorded for transcription and analysis at a later date. For the walking conditions, subjects are asked to walk three minutes under two randomly presented conditions: 1) walking only or 2) walking while having a phone conversation. When performing walking conditions, subjects are asked to walk around the perimeter (roughly 100 feet total) of the laboratory continuously for three minutes at a self-selected pace. A pressure-sensing walkway is positioned along one side of the room to record their steps and provide information regarding gait speed, step length, timing, and width. Gait data will be averaged within each walking bout. The following equation will be used to calculate dual-task cost (DTC):

DTC = ((DT – ST)/ST) * 100.

where DT is dual task condition and ST is the single task condition. A positive DTC value would indicate a benefit and a negative DTC value would indicate a cost. The group mean differences in dual-task cost will be calculated using an independent t-test.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Data collections for this project are still on-going and will be completed in time to present at this conference. Therefore, results and discussion are unavailable at this time.

REFERENCES

1. Montero-Odasso, M., et al., Gait and Cognition: A Complementary Approach to Understanding Brain Function and he Risk of Falling. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2012. 60(11): p. 2127-2136.

2. Springer S, Giladi N, Peretz C, Yogev G, Simon ES, Hausdorff JM. Dual-tasking effects on gait variability: the role of aging, falls, and executive function. Mov Disord. 2006;21:950-957.

3. Yogev-Seligmann G, Hausdorff JM, Giladi N. The role of executive function and attention in gait. Mov Disord. 2008;23:42; quiz 472.

4. Woollacott M, Shumway-Cook A. Attention and the control of posture and gait: a review of an emerging area of research. Gait Posture. 2002;16:1-14.

5. Lundin-Olsson L, Nyberg L, Gustafson Y. "Stops walking when talking" as a predictor of falls in elderly people. Lancet. 1997;349:2.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Funding provided by the NU Collaboration Planning Grant (JBB) and UNO FUSE (KD