Presentation Title

Childcare Provider and Parent Perception of Family Engagement Strategies

Presenter Information

Maggie RasmussenFollow

Advisor Information

Danae Dinkel

Location

MBSC 201

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2020 10:15 AM

Abstract

Childcare Provider and Parent Perception of Family Engagement Strategies

Maggie Rasmussen

University of Nebraska-Omaha

Abstract

Background: In the United States, 8.1 % of 0-2 year olds and 22.8% of 2-5 year olds are overweight or obese. Physical activity and nutrition are two behaviors that are widely recognized to influence weight. Parents are viewed as the primary influence on children’s physical activity and nutrition but given that an estimated 61,498 (51.2%) children in Nebraska are cared for in childcare centers and 22,315 (18.6%) are cared for in family childcare homes, childcare providers also play an important role in the development of health behaviors. To our knowledge, no studies have collectively examined parent and provider perceptions of family engagement strategies for physical activity and nutrition. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of parent and childcare provider communication regarding best practice strategies and family engagement in children’s physical activity and nutrition. Methods: In this study, semi-structured qualitative interviews guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior and Diffusion of Innovation Theory were conducted with providers (n=6) and parents (n=6) in family childcare homes as well as providers (n=6) and parents in childcare centers (n=6). Participants’ responses were transcribed verbatim then uploaded into NVivo12. Demographic surveys were collected from both providers and parents possessing questions about their education level, employment status, nutritional habits, physical activity habits, and so forth. Results: Analysis is ongoing. Conclusion: Our goal is to use the results from this study to identify strategies to help parents and providers better communicate about children’s physical activity and nutrition.

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Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:15 AM

Childcare Provider and Parent Perception of Family Engagement Strategies

MBSC 201

Childcare Provider and Parent Perception of Family Engagement Strategies

Maggie Rasmussen

University of Nebraska-Omaha

Abstract

Background: In the United States, 8.1 % of 0-2 year olds and 22.8% of 2-5 year olds are overweight or obese. Physical activity and nutrition are two behaviors that are widely recognized to influence weight. Parents are viewed as the primary influence on children’s physical activity and nutrition but given that an estimated 61,498 (51.2%) children in Nebraska are cared for in childcare centers and 22,315 (18.6%) are cared for in family childcare homes, childcare providers also play an important role in the development of health behaviors. To our knowledge, no studies have collectively examined parent and provider perceptions of family engagement strategies for physical activity and nutrition. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of parent and childcare provider communication regarding best practice strategies and family engagement in children’s physical activity and nutrition. Methods: In this study, semi-structured qualitative interviews guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior and Diffusion of Innovation Theory were conducted with providers (n=6) and parents (n=6) in family childcare homes as well as providers (n=6) and parents in childcare centers (n=6). Participants’ responses were transcribed verbatim then uploaded into NVivo12. Demographic surveys were collected from both providers and parents possessing questions about their education level, employment status, nutritional habits, physical activity habits, and so forth. Results: Analysis is ongoing. Conclusion: Our goal is to use the results from this study to identify strategies to help parents and providers better communicate about children’s physical activity and nutrition.