Presentation Title

The Identification and Characterization of the LO1S Myovirus

Advisor Information

William Tapprich

Location

MBSC 201

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2020 10:45 AM

End Date

6-3-2020 12:00 PM

Abstract

There are an estimated 1x1031 viruses on earth, meaning there are more viruses than stars in the sky. Surprisingly, only 9,228 of these viruses have a completely characterized genome according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. This discrepancy between the estimated viruses on earth and the viruses we know of means most viruses are unknown to science. By finding, identifying, and characterizing unknown bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, there is the potential to learn more about how viruses function. My work is focused on characterizing of the virus LO1S. This virus was isolated from a water sample collected at the Glacier Creek Preserve. Using electron microscopy imaging we discovered that LO1S is an example of the Myovirus family from the order Caudovirales. We have sequenced and annotated the viral DNA genome, which confirms the identification of the family and order. We have also used restriction digests to validate the genomic sequencing results. SDS-Page gels are being used to characterize the viral proteins composing LO1S’ protein shell. Additionally, we are comparing the LO1S genome sequence to that of other known viruses to elucidate homologous proteins. The left and right ends of the viruses’ genome are being cloned in order to learn more about how the virus packages its DNA and reproduces in the host cell. As more is discovered about LOIS, it will contribute to our knowledge of viruses, possibly aiding in combating dangerous bacterial infections, and it may even useful in bacteriophage therapy.

Comments

I have chemistry class that Friday from 9:00 am to 10:15 am.

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Mar 6th, 10:45 AM Mar 6th, 12:00 PM

The Identification and Characterization of the LO1S Myovirus

MBSC 201

There are an estimated 1x1031 viruses on earth, meaning there are more viruses than stars in the sky. Surprisingly, only 9,228 of these viruses have a completely characterized genome according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. This discrepancy between the estimated viruses on earth and the viruses we know of means most viruses are unknown to science. By finding, identifying, and characterizing unknown bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, there is the potential to learn more about how viruses function. My work is focused on characterizing of the virus LO1S. This virus was isolated from a water sample collected at the Glacier Creek Preserve. Using electron microscopy imaging we discovered that LO1S is an example of the Myovirus family from the order Caudovirales. We have sequenced and annotated the viral DNA genome, which confirms the identification of the family and order. We have also used restriction digests to validate the genomic sequencing results. SDS-Page gels are being used to characterize the viral proteins composing LO1S’ protein shell. Additionally, we are comparing the LO1S genome sequence to that of other known viruses to elucidate homologous proteins. The left and right ends of the viruses’ genome are being cloned in order to learn more about how the virus packages its DNA and reproduces in the host cell. As more is discovered about LOIS, it will contribute to our knowledge of viruses, possibly aiding in combating dangerous bacterial infections, and it may even useful in bacteriophage therapy.