Presenter Information

Hyeon Jung (Judith) KimFollow

Advisor Information

Julie Blaskewicz Boron

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Aging is a natural and multi-faceted process with changes in cognitive, psychological, and physical functioning. The experience of each person is different and may be impacted by individual levels of cognitive, psychological, and physical resilience–these are separate constructs, but may be related. Resilience is crucial as it contributes to sustained physical functioning, personal well-being, and cognitive competence, in addition to facilitating adjustment to change in capacity, activity motivations, and participation in everyday life activities. Depression is one risk factor that can negatively influence cognitive, psychological, and physical resilience. The purpose of the study was to investigate how depressive symptoms and total resilience scores were related to physical resilience. Six participants aged 61.17±9.56years (range 42-68; 4 males) performed three one-minute walking trials (physical resilience). The Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) measured total resilience and depression, respectively. Correlations and multiple regressions were conducted to examine relationships between the independent variables: depression and total resilience (BRS), and the dependent variable (physical resilience measured by walking speed). There was significant positive correlation between depression and walking speed (p=.008), but no correlations between depression and total resilience, or between walking speed and total resilience. Walking speed was significantly predicted by total resilience and depression scores (p=.048), such that faster walking speed (meaning a high number) was associated with lower scores on resilience, and higher scores on depression. Since the collected sample size is very small (n=6), the results are preliminary as data collection is still underway.

COinS
 

Relationships Between Depressive Symptoms and Physical Resilience in Adulthood

Aging is a natural and multi-faceted process with changes in cognitive, psychological, and physical functioning. The experience of each person is different and may be impacted by individual levels of cognitive, psychological, and physical resilience–these are separate constructs, but may be related. Resilience is crucial as it contributes to sustained physical functioning, personal well-being, and cognitive competence, in addition to facilitating adjustment to change in capacity, activity motivations, and participation in everyday life activities. Depression is one risk factor that can negatively influence cognitive, psychological, and physical resilience. The purpose of the study was to investigate how depressive symptoms and total resilience scores were related to physical resilience. Six participants aged 61.17±9.56years (range 42-68; 4 males) performed three one-minute walking trials (physical resilience). The Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) measured total resilience and depression, respectively. Correlations and multiple regressions were conducted to examine relationships between the independent variables: depression and total resilience (BRS), and the dependent variable (physical resilience measured by walking speed). There was significant positive correlation between depression and walking speed (p=.008), but no correlations between depression and total resilience, or between walking speed and total resilience. Walking speed was significantly predicted by total resilience and depression scores (p=.048), such that faster walking speed (meaning a high number) was associated with lower scores on resilience, and higher scores on depression. Since the collected sample size is very small (n=6), the results are preliminary as data collection is still underway.