Presentation Title

Sensory Reweighting in People with a History of Sport-Related Concussion

Presenter Information

Cheyenne JanicekFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Christopher Burcal

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Sport-related concussions (SRC) are traumatic brain injuries sustained in sport due to biomechanical forces acting on the head or neck. They affect the functionality of the brain and how we balance and coordinate movement. Sensory reweighting is the input of information to the brain from the somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems that help with balance. Those who have had a SRC typically have balance deficits and have been shown to incorporate sensory information during sensory reweighting differently than healthy individuals. Deficits in sensory reweighting can be shown through balance assessments like the Sensory Organization Test (SOT). The SOT can only measure under two visual conditions: complete vision or no vision. Stroboscopic glasses are integrated into this study to analyze what happens between when the eyes are completely open or closed. The purpose of this study is to investigate how stroboscopic vision at different frequencies affects the contribution of visual information on balance control in those who have sustained a SRC versus in healthy individuals. The participants will wear the stroboscopic glasses and perform the SOT with six different conditions three times. The conditions are a mixture of normal and absent vision and fixed and sway-referenced support. The three different iterations include: 1) Strobe glasses off, 2) strobe glasses set to low occlusion, and 3) strobe glasses set to high occlusion. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) will be utilized to determine significant differences among fixed vision, high occlusion vision, and low occlusion vision across the somatosensory and visual outcomes, and visual utility.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Sensory Reweighting in People with a History of Sport-Related Concussion

Sport-related concussions (SRC) are traumatic brain injuries sustained in sport due to biomechanical forces acting on the head or neck. They affect the functionality of the brain and how we balance and coordinate movement. Sensory reweighting is the input of information to the brain from the somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems that help with balance. Those who have had a SRC typically have balance deficits and have been shown to incorporate sensory information during sensory reweighting differently than healthy individuals. Deficits in sensory reweighting can be shown through balance assessments like the Sensory Organization Test (SOT). The SOT can only measure under two visual conditions: complete vision or no vision. Stroboscopic glasses are integrated into this study to analyze what happens between when the eyes are completely open or closed. The purpose of this study is to investigate how stroboscopic vision at different frequencies affects the contribution of visual information on balance control in those who have sustained a SRC versus in healthy individuals. The participants will wear the stroboscopic glasses and perform the SOT with six different conditions three times. The conditions are a mixture of normal and absent vision and fixed and sway-referenced support. The three different iterations include: 1) Strobe glasses off, 2) strobe glasses set to low occlusion, and 3) strobe glasses set to high occlusion. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) will be utilized to determine significant differences among fixed vision, high occlusion vision, and low occlusion vision across the somatosensory and visual outcomes, and visual utility.