Presentation Title

Oops I did It Again

Presenter Information

Adam DamadzicFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Kelsey Medeiros

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

The leadership literature typically views leadership in a romantic lens. As a result, little research has addressed the consequences of leadership gone wrong. Moreover, of the research that looks at this darker side of leadership, little scholarly attention has been paid to examining the interaction of gender and environment on followers’ perceptions after an error. To address this complex relationship, the present effort examines followers’ perceptions of various leader outcomes after a leader commits an error, the unique role of gender, the follower’s gender, and the formality of the situation in which the error occurs. Using an experimental design, participants responded to a business case where their leader had committed an error and participants reported on various follower perceptions. Results suggest that errors occurring in formal situations may be more influential for follower perceptions. Additionally, follower perceptions after an error may vary as a function of one’s gender. This work adds to an emerging body of research contributing to less explored avenues of leadership. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

Available for download on Thursday, May 25, 3020

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Oops I did It Again

The leadership literature typically views leadership in a romantic lens. As a result, little research has addressed the consequences of leadership gone wrong. Moreover, of the research that looks at this darker side of leadership, little scholarly attention has been paid to examining the interaction of gender and environment on followers’ perceptions after an error. To address this complex relationship, the present effort examines followers’ perceptions of various leader outcomes after a leader commits an error, the unique role of gender, the follower’s gender, and the formality of the situation in which the error occurs. Using an experimental design, participants responded to a business case where their leader had committed an error and participants reported on various follower perceptions. Results suggest that errors occurring in formal situations may be more influential for follower perceptions. Additionally, follower perceptions after an error may vary as a function of one’s gender. This work adds to an emerging body of research contributing to less explored avenues of leadership. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.