Presentation Title

Determining the efficacy of a combinational therapy against the chronic stage of Toxoplasma gondii

Presenter Information

LeeAnna LuiFollow

Advisor Information

Paul H. Davis, PhD

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that infects 30% of the world’s population. Toxoplasmosis, the disease caused by T. gondii infection, causes mild cold symptoms in its host initially. Existing in its acute stage, T. gondii replicates and infects quickly. However, after weeks, the parasite transforms into a slow replicating stage that forms within cells as cysts, existing in the host’s brain, eyes, and muscle tissue. Currently, there is no treatment for this cyst stage, which can reemerge and cause lethal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Our work suggests that a novel combination of already approved drugs significantly reduces and potentially eradicates cyst burden. Through in vitro tissue culture and in vivo murine drug studies, we examine the efficacy of this cocktail and its ability to clear cyst burden in chronic infection models. If successful, we will be closer to creating a combinational approach with FDA approved drugs that eradicate the chronic infection of T. gondii.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Determining the efficacy of a combinational therapy against the chronic stage of Toxoplasma gondii

Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that infects 30% of the world’s population. Toxoplasmosis, the disease caused by T. gondii infection, causes mild cold symptoms in its host initially. Existing in its acute stage, T. gondii replicates and infects quickly. However, after weeks, the parasite transforms into a slow replicating stage that forms within cells as cysts, existing in the host’s brain, eyes, and muscle tissue. Currently, there is no treatment for this cyst stage, which can reemerge and cause lethal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Our work suggests that a novel combination of already approved drugs significantly reduces and potentially eradicates cyst burden. Through in vitro tissue culture and in vivo murine drug studies, we examine the efficacy of this cocktail and its ability to clear cyst burden in chronic infection models. If successful, we will be closer to creating a combinational approach with FDA approved drugs that eradicate the chronic infection of T. gondii.