Presentation Title

Gaze Control During the Dynamic Visual Acuity Test

Presenter Information

Isha DhakalFollow

Advisor Information

Mukul Mukherjee

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

In this project, we will be examing gaze control in participants during a dynamic visual acuity task (DVAT) that tests an individual’s ability to perceive shifts in their environment using Tobii eye-tracking glasses (Tobii, Danderyd, Sweden). We will be able to determine how the speed of walking will affect gaze control in a dynamic environment and how walking on unstable surfaces will affect gaze control in a dynamic environment. We have hypothesized that when the speed of walking differs from the preferred walking speed, gaze control will be reduced, since individuals may not be able to control their gaze as they would during their preferred walking speed due to the need to adapt to the changing speeds. We also hypothesized that individuals may not be able to control their gaze on an oscillating treadmill as they would with no oscillation because the shift of gaze would be more towards finding a stable point to account for the oscillations occurring. To test these hypotheses, a walking test will be completed on a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment which is a treadmill on a platform that has six degrees of freedom. They will also be wearing eye-tracking glasses that allow for gaze tracking while completing the DVAT. The goal of this task is for participants to be able to obtain a perception threshold of the point of emergence, which is where the optic flow is coming towards the individual. Knowing this will allow us to test our hypotheses.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Gaze Control During the Dynamic Visual Acuity Test

In this project, we will be examing gaze control in participants during a dynamic visual acuity task (DVAT) that tests an individual’s ability to perceive shifts in their environment using Tobii eye-tracking glasses (Tobii, Danderyd, Sweden). We will be able to determine how the speed of walking will affect gaze control in a dynamic environment and how walking on unstable surfaces will affect gaze control in a dynamic environment. We have hypothesized that when the speed of walking differs from the preferred walking speed, gaze control will be reduced, since individuals may not be able to control their gaze as they would during their preferred walking speed due to the need to adapt to the changing speeds. We also hypothesized that individuals may not be able to control their gaze on an oscillating treadmill as they would with no oscillation because the shift of gaze would be more towards finding a stable point to account for the oscillations occurring. To test these hypotheses, a walking test will be completed on a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment which is a treadmill on a platform that has six degrees of freedom. They will also be wearing eye-tracking glasses that allow for gaze tracking while completing the DVAT. The goal of this task is for participants to be able to obtain a perception threshold of the point of emergence, which is where the optic flow is coming towards the individual. Knowing this will allow us to test our hypotheses.