Presentation Title

Eye-opening insights into dual-tasking and postural sway

Advisor Information

Carolin Curtze

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Maintaining balance during upright stance is one of the most basic human motor activities and traditionally considered to be automatic. Yet, a growing body of research provides evidence for cognitive demands during quiet standing in healthy and neurologically impaired. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between cognitive effort and increase in postural sway during dual-tasking, i.e. performing a concurrent task. The task we chose for this study is an auditory n-back test. We provided two different versions of the n-back test (i.e., 1-back and 2-back) to healthy individuals from ages 20-30 years old. Participants are presented a sequence of numbers one-by-one. For each number, they need to decide if the current number is the same as the one presented n-numbers ago. During the standing tasks postural sway will be recorded using a single body-worn sensor attached to the lumbar region. Pupil dilation as a natural response of the eye to cognitive effort will be recorded using special eye-tracking glasses. The outcomes of this study will comprehensively characterize the effect of cognitive effort on postural sway, providing an important foundation for assessment of automaticity of postural control in aging and neurological populations.

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COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Eye-opening insights into dual-tasking and postural sway

Maintaining balance during upright stance is one of the most basic human motor activities and traditionally considered to be automatic. Yet, a growing body of research provides evidence for cognitive demands during quiet standing in healthy and neurologically impaired. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between cognitive effort and increase in postural sway during dual-tasking, i.e. performing a concurrent task. The task we chose for this study is an auditory n-back test. We provided two different versions of the n-back test (i.e., 1-back and 2-back) to healthy individuals from ages 20-30 years old. Participants are presented a sequence of numbers one-by-one. For each number, they need to decide if the current number is the same as the one presented n-numbers ago. During the standing tasks postural sway will be recorded using a single body-worn sensor attached to the lumbar region. Pupil dilation as a natural response of the eye to cognitive effort will be recorded using special eye-tracking glasses. The outcomes of this study will comprehensively characterize the effect of cognitive effort on postural sway, providing an important foundation for assessment of automaticity of postural control in aging and neurological populations.