Presentation Title

The Impact of Stress Management on the relation of Loneliness and Chronic Stress in Older Adults

Advisor Information

Dr. Janelle Beadle

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Chronic stress is known to cause negative health outcomes due to the heightened levels of the body’s stress response systems. Older adults are more likely to face chronic stressors than their younger peers, and it is imperative to understand causal factors of stress perception in this age group. One covariate of note for study is loneliness. Loneliness, the perception of being socially isolated, has been found to be predictive of an increased stress response in past studies. However, this relationship was established with younger populations and needs to be further examined in older adult populations. By understanding the strength of association between loneliness and stress perception we can examine potential intervention factors in weakening this bond. A tool of stress reduction, stress management intervention has been shown to lower stress perception over time. Yet, little is known about the moderating effects of stress management on the relation between loneliness and chronic stress. The current study aims to examine the relation of loneliness and stress perception in the older adult population and the differences of that relation between stress management users and non-stress managers. We hypothesize that loneliness and stress perception will be positively associated, but that this relationship will be significantly weaker for older adults who utilize stress management techniques. The study will conduct these assessments using data from older adults who participated previously in ABE Lab studies who completed the UCLA-Loneliness Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Stress Management demographics questionnaire measures at time of participation.

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COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

The Impact of Stress Management on the relation of Loneliness and Chronic Stress in Older Adults

Chronic stress is known to cause negative health outcomes due to the heightened levels of the body’s stress response systems. Older adults are more likely to face chronic stressors than their younger peers, and it is imperative to understand causal factors of stress perception in this age group. One covariate of note for study is loneliness. Loneliness, the perception of being socially isolated, has been found to be predictive of an increased stress response in past studies. However, this relationship was established with younger populations and needs to be further examined in older adult populations. By understanding the strength of association between loneliness and stress perception we can examine potential intervention factors in weakening this bond. A tool of stress reduction, stress management intervention has been shown to lower stress perception over time. Yet, little is known about the moderating effects of stress management on the relation between loneliness and chronic stress. The current study aims to examine the relation of loneliness and stress perception in the older adult population and the differences of that relation between stress management users and non-stress managers. We hypothesize that loneliness and stress perception will be positively associated, but that this relationship will be significantly weaker for older adults who utilize stress management techniques. The study will conduct these assessments using data from older adults who participated previously in ABE Lab studies who completed the UCLA-Loneliness Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Stress Management demographics questionnaire measures at time of participation.