Presentation Title

Improvement in walking speed following revascularization surgery in patients with peripheral artery disease

Presenter Information

Danielle CalpinFollow

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Omaha

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by limited blood flow to the limbs due to narrowed peripheral arteries. Revascularization surgery reduces the pain and improves walking performance by restoring blood flow to the legs. Minimal clinically important difference (MCID) defines the smallest change in an outcome measure that is significant and relevant to individual patients. The aim of this study is to determine the MCID in walking speed in patients with PAD following revascularization surgery. Patients underwent revascularization surgery and participated in experimental testing before (baseline) and six-months after revascularization treatment (pre-surgery). During testing, patients walked across a 10-meter pathway with a reflected marker placed at the heel of the leg most affected by PAD. Walking speed will be calculated as the average distance traveled per second from the reflective marker. MCID in walking speed will be estimated in two ways: i) distribution-based and ii) anchor-based methods. The outcomes of this study will provide the MCID values for small and substantial improvements based on the distribution and anchor-based methods. This knowledge will clarify the functional significance of improvements in patients with PAD experience from revascularization surgery. This knowledge will be useful for clinicians in interpreting the clinical significance and whether improvements following revascularization surgery are meaningful.

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COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Improvement in walking speed following revascularization surgery in patients with peripheral artery disease

Omaha

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by limited blood flow to the limbs due to narrowed peripheral arteries. Revascularization surgery reduces the pain and improves walking performance by restoring blood flow to the legs. Minimal clinically important difference (MCID) defines the smallest change in an outcome measure that is significant and relevant to individual patients. The aim of this study is to determine the MCID in walking speed in patients with PAD following revascularization surgery. Patients underwent revascularization surgery and participated in experimental testing before (baseline) and six-months after revascularization treatment (pre-surgery). During testing, patients walked across a 10-meter pathway with a reflected marker placed at the heel of the leg most affected by PAD. Walking speed will be calculated as the average distance traveled per second from the reflective marker. MCID in walking speed will be estimated in two ways: i) distribution-based and ii) anchor-based methods. The outcomes of this study will provide the MCID values for small and substantial improvements based on the distribution and anchor-based methods. This knowledge will clarify the functional significance of improvements in patients with PAD experience from revascularization surgery. This knowledge will be useful for clinicians in interpreting the clinical significance and whether improvements following revascularization surgery are meaningful.