Presentation Title

Reproducibility of the Feline Five Model: a Multidimensional Examination of Personality in Cats

Advisor Information

Bruce Chase

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

The Feline Five Model (FFM) is a comprehensive personality model comprised of five different dimensions: Neuroticism, Extraversion, Impulsiveness, Dominance, and Agreeableness. The theory behind the model is that the placement on the continuum suggests the individual's personality. This study details how to provide a multifaceted approach to domestic cats' personality using the FFM questionnaire completed by cat owners. We used Qualtrics® to collect personality data using the Feline Five model of (n=307) domestic cats. We used the K-elbow method of selecting the optimal number of clusters by fitting the K-Means model with a range of K values. Then, we used principal components analysis to determine the potential number of factors within the data set. We demonstrated that scores on the questions presented in the Feline Five test aggregate into five distinct clusters. In summary, the final analysis yielded five different factors that depict personality in domestic pet cats from our sample.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Reproducibility of the Feline Five Model: a Multidimensional Examination of Personality in Cats

The Feline Five Model (FFM) is a comprehensive personality model comprised of five different dimensions: Neuroticism, Extraversion, Impulsiveness, Dominance, and Agreeableness. The theory behind the model is that the placement on the continuum suggests the individual's personality. This study details how to provide a multifaceted approach to domestic cats' personality using the FFM questionnaire completed by cat owners. We used Qualtrics® to collect personality data using the Feline Five model of (n=307) domestic cats. We used the K-elbow method of selecting the optimal number of clusters by fitting the K-Means model with a range of K values. Then, we used principal components analysis to determine the potential number of factors within the data set. We demonstrated that scores on the questions presented in the Feline Five test aggregate into five distinct clusters. In summary, the final analysis yielded five different factors that depict personality in domestic pet cats from our sample.