Presentation Title

Resiliency, reserve, and fatiguability: Insights into fall risk

Presenter Information

Alissa MillerFollow

Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0002-7584-3171

Advisor Information

Jenna Yentes

Location

University of Nebraska at Omaha

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

As we age, there is a noticeable loss in muscle mass and bone density which ultimately decreases physical resilience defined as the ability to resist or recover from a stressor. An individual’s ability to recover from a balance disruption is dependent on the difference between a system’s baseline and its maximum capacity to react. The purpose of this study is to measure baseline levels of balance and then determine what maximal threshold capacity cannot be recovered (i.e. a fall). The difference in these levels was considered their maximal balance capacity. Twenty-six middle-aged (40-65 yrs) subjects will be recruited. Subjects were asked to perform the Timed Up and Go (TUG) Test, and complete a balance assessment with five randomized perturbations. Balance sway properties were calculated and compared to their threshold to determine their maximal balance capacity. Data have been collected and are currently being analyzed. Presentation will present results from the analysis.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Resiliency, reserve, and fatiguability: Insights into fall risk

University of Nebraska at Omaha

As we age, there is a noticeable loss in muscle mass and bone density which ultimately decreases physical resilience defined as the ability to resist or recover from a stressor. An individual’s ability to recover from a balance disruption is dependent on the difference between a system’s baseline and its maximum capacity to react. The purpose of this study is to measure baseline levels of balance and then determine what maximal threshold capacity cannot be recovered (i.e. a fall). The difference in these levels was considered their maximal balance capacity. Twenty-six middle-aged (40-65 yrs) subjects will be recruited. Subjects were asked to perform the Timed Up and Go (TUG) Test, and complete a balance assessment with five randomized perturbations. Balance sway properties were calculated and compared to their threshold to determine their maximal balance capacity. Data have been collected and are currently being analyzed. Presentation will present results from the analysis.