Presentation Title

Development and Validation of a Low-Cost 3D Printed Upper Limb Prosthetic Simulator

Presenter Information

Chris CopelandFollow

Advisor Information

Jorge M Zuniga

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Prosthetic simulators are a novel tool used within rehabilitation and can help amputees become more familiar with their new prosthetic device using their unaffected limb. Comparing how prosthetic simulators and prosthetic devices influence contralateral brain activity may lead to a better understanding of the simulator's ability to emulate actual prosthesis control. In the present study, we utilized functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to evaluate the neural response in five children with a congenital upper limb reduction (ULR) using a body-powered prosthesis and five typically developing children (TD) using their non-preferred hand, as well as a prosthetic simulator on the same hand during a 60-second gross motor dexterity task. Our data showed that the ULR group had lower activation within the primary motor cortex (M1) and supplementary motor area (SMA) compared to the TD group but nonsignificant differences in the primary somatosensory area (S1). Compared to using their non-preferred hand, the prosthetic simulator in the TD group resulted in nonsignificant differences in M1 and SMA but significantly higher S1 activation. These results indicate that prosthetic simulators may be unable to emulate the reduced degrees of freedom in individuals with upper limb reductions but provide similar sensory input conditions seen in prosthesis users.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Development and Validation of a Low-Cost 3D Printed Upper Limb Prosthetic Simulator

Prosthetic simulators are a novel tool used within rehabilitation and can help amputees become more familiar with their new prosthetic device using their unaffected limb. Comparing how prosthetic simulators and prosthetic devices influence contralateral brain activity may lead to a better understanding of the simulator's ability to emulate actual prosthesis control. In the present study, we utilized functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to evaluate the neural response in five children with a congenital upper limb reduction (ULR) using a body-powered prosthesis and five typically developing children (TD) using their non-preferred hand, as well as a prosthetic simulator on the same hand during a 60-second gross motor dexterity task. Our data showed that the ULR group had lower activation within the primary motor cortex (M1) and supplementary motor area (SMA) compared to the TD group but nonsignificant differences in the primary somatosensory area (S1). Compared to using their non-preferred hand, the prosthetic simulator in the TD group resulted in nonsignificant differences in M1 and SMA but significantly higher S1 activation. These results indicate that prosthetic simulators may be unable to emulate the reduced degrees of freedom in individuals with upper limb reductions but provide similar sensory input conditions seen in prosthesis users.