Presentation Title

Analysis of Foliate Taste Bud Morphology Following Chorda Tympani Transection in the Rat.

Presenter Information

Dylan HallstomFollow

Advisor Information

Suzanne Sollars

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 10:00 AM

Abstract

On the posterolateral region of the tongue, there consists of multiple trenches that are line with foliate papillae. Each of these papillae contain 100+ tastebuds responsible for transmitting signals of taste to the central nervous system. Two distinctive nerves innervate these tastebuds depending on if the papilla is in trenches more anterior (Chordia tympani [CT]) or posterior (Glossopharyngeal [GL]) regions [1]. Each main branch of these nerves comprises of a cell body to interpret and glomerate information from each of these tastebuds (CT: geniculate ganglion [GG]; GL: petrosal ganglia [PG]). Obstruction to the CT (CTX) during development within Sprague-Dawley rats (≤ 10 days), tastebuds diminish, and the nerve was assumed to not regenerate unlike in adults (≥ 40 days) [2]. This would suggest that the GG would diminish in mass and neuron counts significantly, yet 30% of the neurons survive [3]. Most likely a result to the varying effects following CTX between the fungiform and anterior foliate taste buds [4].

Additional Information (Optional)

1. Whiteside (1927). Nerve overlap in the gustatory apparatus of the rat.

2. Sollars. Smith, & Hill (2002). Time course of morphological alterations of fungiform papillae and taste buds following chorda tympani transection in neonatal rat.

3. Martin, Lane, Samson, & Sollars, (2019). Regenerative failure following rat neonatal chorda tympani transection is associated with geniculate ganglion cell loss and terminal field plasticity in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

4. Apa.(2018). UNPUBLISHED WORK

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 10:00 AM

Analysis of Foliate Taste Bud Morphology Following Chorda Tympani Transection in the Rat.

On the posterolateral region of the tongue, there consists of multiple trenches that are line with foliate papillae. Each of these papillae contain 100+ tastebuds responsible for transmitting signals of taste to the central nervous system. Two distinctive nerves innervate these tastebuds depending on if the papilla is in trenches more anterior (Chordia tympani [CT]) or posterior (Glossopharyngeal [GL]) regions [1]. Each main branch of these nerves comprises of a cell body to interpret and glomerate information from each of these tastebuds (CT: geniculate ganglion [GG]; GL: petrosal ganglia [PG]). Obstruction to the CT (CTX) during development within Sprague-Dawley rats (≤ 10 days), tastebuds diminish, and the nerve was assumed to not regenerate unlike in adults (≥ 40 days) [2]. This would suggest that the GG would diminish in mass and neuron counts significantly, yet 30% of the neurons survive [3]. Most likely a result to the varying effects following CTX between the fungiform and anterior foliate taste buds [4].