Presentation Title

Microglia Response to Chorda Tympani Transection in Calorie Restricted Rats

Presenter Information

Sarah JohnsonFollow

Advisor Information

Suzanne Sollars

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Microglia are crucial components of the immune response to damage, increasing in number around damaged tissue. Taste information is transmitted via the chorda tympani nerve (CT) from taste buds on the tongue to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the medulla (Rao & Tadi, 2019). Following injury of the CT (CTX), an increase in microglia of the NTS has been observed (Riquier & Sollars, 2017). Following central nervous system damage, microglia retain their morphology in rats with a calorie restricted diet, while microglia activation occurred as expected in rats allowed unlimited access to food (Loncarevic-Vasiljkovic et al., 2012). Since microglia activation can be damaging, caloric restriction may attenuate the microglia response to CTX, facilitating recovery. This proposed study will assess microglia quantity and morphology in caloric restricted rats following CTX. It is hypothesized that the quantity and size of microglia will decrease when accompanied by a calorie restricted diet (Loncarevic-Vasiljkovic et al., 2012).

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Microglia Response to Chorda Tympani Transection in Calorie Restricted Rats

Microglia are crucial components of the immune response to damage, increasing in number around damaged tissue. Taste information is transmitted via the chorda tympani nerve (CT) from taste buds on the tongue to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the medulla (Rao & Tadi, 2019). Following injury of the CT (CTX), an increase in microglia of the NTS has been observed (Riquier & Sollars, 2017). Following central nervous system damage, microglia retain their morphology in rats with a calorie restricted diet, while microglia activation occurred as expected in rats allowed unlimited access to food (Loncarevic-Vasiljkovic et al., 2012). Since microglia activation can be damaging, caloric restriction may attenuate the microglia response to CTX, facilitating recovery. This proposed study will assess microglia quantity and morphology in caloric restricted rats following CTX. It is hypothesized that the quantity and size of microglia will decrease when accompanied by a calorie restricted diet (Loncarevic-Vasiljkovic et al., 2012).